Patented nanostructure for solar cells: Rough optics, smooth surface

September 18, 2018, Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres
The nanostructure for capturing light is imprinted on silicon oxide (blue) and then "leveled" with titanium oxide (green). Credit: HZB

Thin-film solar cells made of crystalline silicon are inexpensive and achieve efficiencies of around 14 percent. However, they could do even better if their shiny surfaces reflected less light. A team led by Prof. Christiane Becker from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has now patented a sophisticated new solution to this problem

"It is not enough simply to bring more light into the cell," says Becker. Such surface structures can even ultimately reduce the efficiency by impairing the electronic properties of the material.

The idea that David Eisenhauer worked out as part of his doctorate in Becker's team sounds quite simple, but it requires a completely new approach: to produce a structure that behaves "optically rough" and scatters the light, but at the same time provides a "smooth" surface on which the silicon layer (the most important layer of the solar cell) can grow with virtually no defects.

The procedure consists of several steps: first, the researchers imprint an optimised onto a still liquid silicon oxide precursor layer that is then cured with UV light and heat. This creates tiny, regularly arranged cylindrical elevations that are ideal for capturing light. However, the absorbing layer of crystalline cannot grow flawlessly on this rough surface, so these structures have an unfavorable effect on the quality of the solar cell. In order to resolve this conflict, a very thin layer of titanium oxide is spin coated on top of the nanostructure in order to produce a relatively smooth surface on which the actual absorber material can be deposited and crystallized.

The coating has the descriptive name "SMART" for smooth anti-reflective three-dimensional texture. It reduces reflections and brings more into the absorbing layer without impairing its . The procedure is now patented.

Christiane Becker heads a Young Investigator Group at the HZB funded by the BMBF under the NanoMatFutur programme. As part of the BerOSE Joint Lab, she works closely with the Zuse Institute to use computer simulations for understanding the effects of nanostructuring on material properties.

Explore further: Researchers use silicon nanoparticles for enhancing solar cells efficiency

More information: David Eisenhauer et al. Smooth anti-reflective three-dimensional textures for liquid phase crystallized silicon thin-film solar cells on glass, Scientific Reports (2017). DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-02874-y

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Multiple stellar populations detected in the cluster Hodge 6

February 18, 2019

Using ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have found that the cluster Hodge 6 hosts multiple stellar populations. The detection could provide important hints on the formation and evolution of Hodge 6 and star clusters ...

Predicting sequence from structure

February 18, 2019

One way to probe intricate biological systems is to block their components from interacting and see what happens. This method allows researchers to better understand cellular processes and functions, augmenting everyday laboratory ...

Energetic particles can bombard exoplanets

February 18, 2019

TRAPPIST-1 is a system of seven Earth-sized worlds orbiting an ultra-cool dwarf star about 120 light-years away. The star, and hence its system of planets, is thought to be between five-to-ten billion years old, up to twice ...

Meteorite source in asteroid belt not a single debris field

February 17, 2019

A new study published online in Meteoritics and Planetary Science finds that our most common meteorites, those known as L chondrites, come from at least two different debris fields in the asteroid belt. The belt contains ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

tekram
not rated yet Sep 18, 2018
'an efficiency of 36.4 mA cm−2 × 650 mV  × 0.75 = 18% could potentially be reached for liquid-phase crystallized thin-film silicon solar cells exhibiting a SMART texture and additional light-management techniques at other interface in the device.'

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.