Related topics: light

Metal-organic framework nanoribbons

The nanostructure of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) plays an important role in various applications since different nanostructures usually exhibit different properties and functions. In this work, the authors reported the ...

How do atoms vibrate in graphene nanostructures?

In order to understand advanced materials like graphene nanostructures and optimize them for devices in nano-, opto- and quantum-technology it is crucial to understand how phonons—the vibration of atoms in solids—influence ...

Heterophase nanostructures contributing to efficient catalysis

Selective catalysis plays a key role in various applications, such as the chemical industry and oil refining, hence, developing catalysts with high efficiency and excellent chemoselectivity has become a research hotspot. ...

Self-healing DNA nanostructures

DNA assembled into nanostructures such as tubes and origami-inspired shapes could someday find applications ranging from DNA computers to nanomedicine. However, these intriguing structures don't persist long in biological ...

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Nanostructure

A nanostructure is an object of intermediate size between molecular and microscopic (micrometer-sized) structures.

In describing nanostructures it is necessary to differentiate between the number of dimensions on the nanoscale. Nanotextured surfaces have one dimension on the nanoscale, i.e., only the thickness of the surface of an object is between 0.1 and 100 nm. Nanotubes have two dimensions on the nanoscale, i.e., the diameter of the tube is between 0.1 and 100 nm; its length could be much greater. Finally, spherical nanoparticles have three dimensions on the nanoscale, i.e., the particle is between 0.1 and 100 nm in each spatial dimension. The terms nanoparticles and ultrafine particles (UFP) often are used synonymously although UFP can reach into the micrometre range.

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