Ancient bird bones redate human activity in Madagascar by 6,000 years

September 12, 2018, Zoological Society of London
Disarticulation marks on the base of the tarsometatarsus. These cut marks were made when removing the toes from the foot. Credit: ZSL

Analysis of bones, from what was once the world's largest bird, has revealed that humans arrived on the tropical island of Madagascar more than 6,000 years earlier than previously thought—according to a study published today, 12 September 2018, in the journal Science Advances.

A team of scientists led by international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) discovered that ancient bones from the extinct Madagascan elephant (Aepyornis and Mullerornis) show cut marks and depression fractures consistent with hunting and butchery by . Using radiocarbon dating techniques, the team were then able to determine when these giant birds had been killed, reassessing when humans first reached Madagascar.

Previous research on lemur bones and archaeological artefacts suggested that humans first arrived in Madagascar 2,400-4,000 years ago. However, the new study provides of presence on Madagascar as far back as 10,500 years ago—making these modified elephant bird bones the earliest known evidence of humans on the island.

Lead author Dr. James Hansford from ZSL's Institute of Zoology said: "We already know that Madagascar's megafauna—elephant birds, hippos, giant tortoises and giant lemurs—became extinct less than 1,000 years ago. There are a number of theories about why this occurred, but the extent of human involvement hasn't been clear.

This chop mark would have been made with a large sharp tool. The clear straight line of the cut with no continued cracks indicate the mark was made on fresh bone and chopped into different cuts of meat. Credit: ZSL

"Our research provides evidence of human activity in Madagascar more than 6,000 years earlier than previously suspected—which demonstrates that a radically different extinction theory is required to understand the huge biodiversity loss that has occurred on the island. Humans seem to have coexisted with elephant birds and other now-extinct species for over 9,000 years, apparently with limited negative impact on biodiversity for most of this period, which offers new insights for conservation today."

Illustration of a Vorompatra (Elephant bird) skeleton. Credit: Alain Rasolo, Wildlife Artist, Madagascar

Co-author Professor Patricia Wright from Stony Brook University said: "This new discovery turns our idea of the first human arrivals on its head. We know that at the end of the Ice Age, when humans were only using stone tools, there were a group of humans that arrived on Madagascar. We do not know the origin of these people and won't until we find further archaeological evidence, but we know there is no evidence of their genes in modern populations. The question remains—who these people were? And when and why did they disappear?"

The bones of the elephant birds studied by this project were originally found in 2009 in Christmas River in south-central Madagascar—a fossil ' bed' containing a rich concentration of ancient animal remains. This marsh site could have been a major kill site, but further research is required to confirm.

Close up of the disarticulation marks on the base of the tarsometatarsus. Here you can see the v-shaped tool mark and rough edges indicating a stone tool was used. Credit: ZSL

Explore further: Elephant bird probably wiped out by nest raiders and habitat loss

More information: J. Hansford el al., "Early Holocene human presence in Madagascar evidenced by exploitation of avian megafauna," Science Advances (2018). advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/9/eaat6925

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rrwillsj
2.3 / 5 (6) Sep 12, 2018
Constantly improving weaponry, constantly improving social organization. Disruption of the megafauna ecology to feed expanding human populations.

In addition to ruthless hunting of the big game animals. Increasing foreign trade meant increasing market-driven exploitation of megafauna furs & feathers, hides & leather, meat & ivory/teeth/bone products.

What do we want?
We want in now!
Whatever the hell we want.
Whenever we want to take it.
Whatever the consequences.

We always hope someone else will have to pay the debts we run up!
Mark Thomas
4 / 5 (2) Sep 12, 2018
rrwillsj, you are right as far as it goes, but you need to cut the human race a break. All signs are it is very difficult to transition from an animal species to an advanced, enlightened one. If you were a starving caveman and somebody offered you a plate of well-prepared elephant bird meat I suspect you would gobble it down with the best of them. Today I suspect you would never consume an endangered species.
Cusco
5 / 5 (2) Sep 13, 2018
Yet another site where deep ocean navigation apparently existed much earlier than previously thought, since there is no other way to reach Madagascar.
Thorium Boy
1 / 5 (3) Sep 13, 2018
Constantly improving weaponry, constantly improving social organization. Disruption of the megafauna ecology to feed expanding human populations.

In addition to ruthless hunting of the big game animals. Increasing foreign trade meant increasing market-driven exploitation of megafauna furs & feathers, hides & leather, meat & ivory/teeth/bone products.

What do we want?
We want in now!
Whatever the hell we want.
Whenever we want to take it.
Whatever the consequences.

We always hope someone else will have to pay the debts we run up!


We are also the only species to amount to anything.
rrwillsj
1.5 / 5 (2) Sep 13, 2018
Well TB, out of the dozens of "intelligent" species sharing this singular world? Human's with their self-proclaimed superiority are the only species actively trying to destroy it!

Oh hurray for us! "We have met the enemy and he is us." What a "prideful" legacy of waste and greed we will leave for our Giant Cockroach successors to sneer at!
antigoracle
2.5 / 5 (2) Sep 13, 2018
Well TB, out of the dozens of "intelligent" species sharing this singular world? Human's with their self-proclaimed superiority are the only species actively trying to destroy it!

Oh hurray for us! "We have met the enemy and he is us." What a "prideful" legacy of waste and greed we will leave for our Giant Cockroach successors to sneer at!

Once a pathological LIAR...always a PATHOLOGICAL LIAR.
rrwillsj is none other than, the "holier than thou", gskam, using a sock-puppet to dupe those who would otherwise ignore him.
rrwillsj
not rated yet Sep 14, 2018
old auntieoral, she is proof that a swelled head is no indication of intelligence!

Get that saudi hand out of your own ass before you bluster about anyone else being a sockpuppet!

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