Tesla's all-electric semi truck aims to disrupt transport

Tesla Chairman and CEO Elon Musk unveils the new electric "Semi" Truck on November 16, 2017 in Hawthorne, California
Tesla Chairman and CEO Elon Musk unveils the new electric "Semi" Truck on November 16, 2017 in Hawthorne, California

After shaking up the auto world with its electric cars, Tesla is tackling a new frontier in "green" transportation with the unveiling of a futuristic all-electric semi truck.

Elon Musk, the South African-born inventor and entrepreneur, showcased the new vehicle Thursday in Hawthorne, California, site of Tesla's design bureau and the headquarters of the billionaire's aerospace company SpaceX.

With a sleek, aerodynamic profile, the Tesla Semi is billed as quicker and more economical than today's diesel-powered trucks.

"We designed the Tesla truck to be like a bullet," said Musk, Tesla's co-founder and chief executive who aims to start production in 2019 with deliveries by 2020—although some analysts expressed caution over Tesla's ability to meet its own timetable.

With four independent electric motors and a transmission that requires no shifting of gears, the Semi can accelerate to 60 miles (100 kilometers) per hour in five seconds—reaching that speed in 20 seconds while hauling a maximum 80,000 pound (36,000 kilogram) load, much faster than a traditional diesel truck, Tesla says.

Most crucially, it can travel 800 kilometers (500 miles) between charges, more than double the length of most truck routes, 80 percent of which, according to Musk, are 250 miles or less.

"So it means you can go to your destination and back without recharging," he said.

Tesla claims its Semi, which could be recharged at the firm's 1,000 free Supercharger stations worldwide, can save 20 percent over conventional transport rigs with fuel and insurance factored in—while delivering a "better experience" for truck drivers through its cab design.

With no front engine or gear shift to accommodate, the driver's seat is positioned in the center of a panoramic windshield, with a dominating view of the road.

Instead of the traditional console, there are touch screens for navigation, music and traffic data.

Inside, the cab has enough head and legroom to stand up and walk around. The traditional second front seat is relegated to the back of the cab as a jump seat.

The Semi also uses some of the same navigation aids as Tesla's Model 3 sedan, such as cameras, and sensors designed to minimize blind spots, abrupt lane changes and emergency stops.

Tesla co-founder and CEO Elon Musk says his electric Semi Truck can save 20 percent compared with traditional diesel rigs, after
Tesla co-founder and CEO Elon Musk says his electric Semi Truck can save 20 percent compared with traditional diesel rigs, after factoring in fuel and insurance costs

Bumps in the road?

But despite the truck's glitzy debut, some analysts warned it remains unclear if or when Tesla can deliver on its promises.

"We've come to expect very forward-thinking products from Tesla," said Rebecca Lindland, analyst for the auto research firm Kelley Blue Book who said the Tesla Semi concept "makes a lot of sense" for vehicles with predictable routes like garbage trucks or school buses.

Lindland added however that Musk "is not great at keeping deadlines" and that "we need to add weeks, months or years" to his timetable.

Another concern is that Tesla is bleeding cash as it invests in new vehicles like the Model 3, a more affordable electric sedan.

The pace of production of the Model 3, for instance, is way behind target, peaking at 500 to 1,000 a week instead of a promised 5,000.

"Wall Street continues to be very tolerant of Elon Musk's strategy, as they consider it a tech company and not an automobile manufacturing company," Lindland said.

"But there will come a time when investors won't be as tolerant and will need to start seeing profits."

'Green' trucks

Joseph Spak of RBC Capital Markets said he was impressed by the truck, saying its specifications "exceeded expectations."

"While Tesla has had challenges meeting deadlines, it does eventually get there," Spak said in a research note. "As such, expect the topic of the electrification of (cargo trucks) and Tesla's disruption of that segment to step up."

Tesla's Semi is arriving at a time when a variety of automakers—Daimler, Volkswagen, Nikola, Einride—are also developing electric truck prototypes, some equipped with autonomous driving functions and futuristic designs.

Experts note that heavy goods vehicles and buses already are being powered with alternative energy sources like hydrogen batteries or natural gas.

Tesla has not given out details on how much the trucks will cost or where they will be built.


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Tesla sets semi-truck debut for October 26

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Nov 17, 2017
I love how he announces a car that "will do 0-60 in 1.9 seconds." Yet nothing has been tested. He hasn't actually done it. To many of his claims don't live up to the hype. We will see if the Range, speed and hauling capacity is there.

Nov 17, 2017
Yet nothing has been tested. He hasn't actually done it
You moron.

"Tesla gave rides in the Roadster to select VIPs at the unveil event, including Brooks from DragTimes, who shot a video that includes launch and acceleration demos."
https://youtu.be/izhYXO9wKz0

Video of sub-2sec 0 to 60.

This is the internet. If you don't know how to look up things up, what makes you think you're entitled to an opinion?

Nov 17, 2017
Elon has not only produced some amazing Tesla cars and trucks, but he jump-started the Auto Industry toward an electric future. Tesla is showing that EVs can be quicker, cleaner, and hopefully cheaper than ICE vehicles. If internal combustion engines can be largely phased out by 2040, and if fossil-fuel power plants can be replaced by renewables and nuclear power, then Global Warming might be controlled after all.

Even if Wall Street and the established auto companies succeed in bankrupting Tesla, Elon Musk will still be considered one of the most successful men of our time.

Nov 17, 2017
Too bad we will be freezing to death by then.

Nov 17, 2017
Tesla has done a wonderful job introducing us to great battery and power control technology. It is unfortunate that its manufacturing department is not at the same level as its design and development departments. Pricing also leaves something to be desired. The last is true across the board for electric cars. At the price of gasoline today, it would take me 10 years to hit the break even point driving an electric car rather than a comparable gasoline car considering the cost difference. I fear the same thing would be true for an electric semi. Perhaps Tesla should have considered making electric school buses. Most of them are idle during the school day, so smaller, cheaper batteries could be used, since they could be charged during the idle periods, as well as at night.

Nov 17, 2017
@Ratwrangler. Interesting recommendation about school buses. School buses are a niche market, and it might be logical for a small new company to aim for that category. But Elon Musk wants to transform the transportation sector in a planet-saving way, and the auto and trucking sectors are much bigger CO2 emmitters than school buses.

Currently EVs are more expensive than ICEVs, but EV costs are expected to drop considerably by 2020, according to GM's CEO. (Many of GM's EVs might be made in China.) Furthermore, post-Trump presidents will probably be much more concerned about Global Warming, and ICEVs might be taxed, restricted, or even banned from urban areas. I'm looking forward to getting an EV, perhaps a Tesla 3, and I may even convert a couple of my antique cars to electric motors.

Nov 18, 2017
It should carry spare batteries to which it will be automatically connected after every 500 miles.

Nov 18, 2017
but he jump-started the Auto Industry toward an electric future


Correction: Panasonic did. Without the batteries, there would be no Tesla. The rest is pretty trivial, as there's no great new engineering going on in putting an electric motor in a car. It's a 200 year old invention and people have re-tried it every 20-30 years.

It's all about the batteries: what sort of power output, capacities, charging speeds; all that dominates perfectly what you can do with an electric car. For example, the Model S peak acceleration is limited by the battery - as they add more battery cells, they get to "turn up the volume" at the motor controller. That's all there is to it.

That's why hailing Tesla as the savior is completely misguided. Everybody's waiting for the better battery - Tesla is just jumping the gun at the top end of the market while the batteries are still too expensive, too heavy, and still too unsafe for the mass markets.

Nov 18, 2017
Tesla has done a wonderful job introducing us to great battery and power control technology.


You mean, Tesla has -bought- some great battery and power control technology?

The batteries are by a joint venture with Panasonic. The power controller technology comes originally from AC-Propulsion. They licensed the technology first, and the modified it enough to skip the patents and call it their own.

Elon Musk is a venture capitalist, not an inventor. He buys stuff, puts a marketing spin on it, and then sells it to the public as a great new innovation. He promises it will do wonders, and then if his hired engineers don't manage to make it work, he simply comes up with a new wonder-machine to sell and distract from the failure of the previous one.

Nov 18, 2017
Eikka wrote, "...and then if his hired engineers don't manage to make it work..."

What products has Musk developed that failed to work?

Eikka wrote, "Everybody's waiting for the better battery - Tesla is just jumping the gun at the top end of the market while the batteries are still too expensive, too heavy, and still too unsafe for the mass markets."

Well, that's the thing: current batteries are *not* too expensive, too heavy or too unsafe to be useful. It's true that Tesla's products started at the high end and are working their way down, but that's a workable plan. Performance is improving, prices are dropping.

As for safety, in what universe are batteries less safe than refined petroleum products? You can get a fire if a battery pack is punctured, but not an explosion. Tesla has had vehicles on the road for years now, and there is no evidence that they are less safe than ICE vehicles. Perfectly safe? No, but ICE vehicles are worse.

Nov 18, 2017
Look at what Tesla has on offer with the Tesla Semi. Zero to sixty in 5 seconds with the maximum load permitted on US highways. 500 mile range, with a promise of 30 minutes charging to recover 400 miles more range. (That dovetails well with mandatory rest breaks, and who wants to drive more than 14 hours in a day? Crazy, dangerous people, that's who.) Better visibility for the driver. Safety features not seen in most ICE semis, lane-keeping and accident avoidance, automatic jack-knife prevention, automated convoys, regenerative braking, 60 MPH on a 5 degree graded road, lower cost-per-mile... that's only a partial list.

It's absurd to credit Panasonic for all of the innovation in Tesla products. The Tesla Semi is insanely good with current-gen battery tech. When that tech improves, swap battery packs and it's going to be even better. Panasonic makes good cells and battery control circuits. Tesla does the rest, and it's a lot.

Nov 18, 2017
That's why hailing Tesla as the savior is completely misguided. Everybody's waiting for the better battery - Tesla is just jumping the gun at the top end of the market while the batteries are still too expensive, too heavy, and still too unsafe for the mass markets
Ignorance is bliss

"Tesla broke ground on the Gigafactory in June 2014 outside Sparks, Nevada. The name Gigafactory comes from the word "Giga," the unit of measurement representing "billions." The factory's planned annual battery production capacity is 35 gigawatt-hours (GWh), with one GWh being the equivalent of generating (or consuming) 1 billion watts for one hour. This is nearly as much as the entire world's current battery production combined."

- but you dont seem to be very happy to me. No not at all.

Nov 18, 2017
Perfectly safe? No

In the end you'll always have concentrated energy in a vehicle (at least one that is not connected to some kind of power carrying lanes or similar), and that energy can always be released in a faster way than intended. If you want to be 'fire/explosion-proof' then you have to resort to walking.
Found this statsitic from 2013: In the US the probability for a gasoline car having a fire incident is about 4 times higher than for an electric car.
https://hbr.org/2...red-cars
(Also: 400 fire related deaths in gasoline cars...zero such deaths in electric cars, so the fires in these seem to be quite a bit 'tamer')

Battery prices are dropping at an astonishing rate (currently about 10% per year) - this looks like the price drop which we experienced (and are still seeing) in solar pannels.

The weight of a battery also means...nothing. Who cares how heavy it is?

Nov 18, 2017
Deleted. (double post)

Nov 18, 2017
The only serious questions about the Tesla Semi are: what will it cost, and when will it be produced?

It's sure to come in at the high end, just like the Roadster did. Just how high remains to be seen.

As for production, we all know that Musk sets aspirational targets for Tesla. They usually slip. But it's not like the other major Semi manufacturers are ready to produce significant quantities of their prototypes. Tesla controls its own battery supply chain; nobody else does, not on Tesla's scale. Even with slippage, Tesla is very likely to be the first to mass-market an electric Semi.

They aren't going to have trouble attracting investors, because the product is incredibly compelling, and because Tesla plans to build more gigafactories. Their competitors haven't sourced batteries in significant quantities aren't even at the niche market stage in their manufacturing plans.

Tesla will eat their lunches. Not immediately, but give it time.

Nov 18, 2017
"...Gigafactory ramping up production, Tesla's cost of battery cells will significantly decline through economies of scale, innovative manufacturing, reduction of waste, and the simple optimization of locating most manufacturing processes under one roof."

"Starting from the "less than $190/kWh" cost and applying a 35% reduction leads to "less than $124/kWh". If we assume a 55 kWh battery pack, the battery in the base Model 3 would cost "less than" $6,875. While it would still likely be the most costly component in the car, it's starting to become reasonable in a $35,000 vehicle."

- The question eikka needs to ask is what makes him think he is privy to certain critical facts that would make the $billions that these innovators have already invested, completely wasted?

Why doesn't eikka assume that the 1000s of people involved in these projects have already considered anything that eikka could dream up, because they are all more informed and educated than he?

Nov 18, 2017
Auntie wrote, "The weight of a battery also means...nothing. Who cares how heavy it is?"

In the case of the Tesla Semi, it's sort of an advantage. I mean, sure, we'd like greater energy density in the battery packs. But there's enough energy in these packs to deliver superior performance in a semi truck, and the weight of the pack lowers the center of gravity of the truck, which is a big deal. You *can't* get the center of gravity much lower in a diesel truck. They're *always* at risk of a roll-over. That risk is reduced considerably with the Tesla Semi.

So, it's not quite 'nothing.'

EVs will run to the heavy side, particularly if they have desirable ranges. But the weight doesn't crimp performance, which is the point I think you were making, and arguably makes Tesla vehicles safer.

Nov 18, 2017
Musk is trying. It really doesn't matter how he does it, @Eikka.

Nov 18, 2017
So, it's not quite 'nothing.'

The point I was trying to make is: you buy a car (or a truck) for ist performance. A truck has to fulfil the use case of trucking which is: be cost efficient.
...which in turn breaks down to:
- get to a location within minimum time (no unnecessary stops). This requires a certain minimum range on one tank/charge.
- be able to carry maximum allowable weight
- low maintenance (every day spent on maintenance is a day not spent making money)
- long lifetime (which somewhat correlates with low maintenance), because the cost of a truck is initial cost divided by the number of years until it needs replacement

Handling characteristics are nice, but don't really figure into it.

The way I see it the Tesla truck has all the bases covered. I hope they succeed in changing the way trucking is done.

Nov 18, 2017
They're *always* at risk of a roll-over.

I'm learning this in my current job - which has nothing to do with trucking, but shares one element with it - viz.: the people who buy the product aren't the ones that actually use it. What is important to the driver doesn't figure into the buying process for a logistics company at all.

In my case we're dealing with service providers who buy large machines for hospitals (MR, CT, Xray, etc.). How well the machine handles for the doctor is completely irrelevant in the sales process (even though we, naturally, try to make them as user friendly as we can). The HSP's just look at their checklists and say "can do this...can do that...price is best...OK, we'll buy it"...They might not even see the product in person.

Nov 18, 2017
Speaking of electricity and old men (and brilliant innovators), THIS is awful.

"Malcolm Young, AC/DC Guitarist and Co-Founder, Dead at 64
Guitarist who co-founded Australian rock legends in 1973 with brother Angus Young dies following battle with dementia..."

-I think it was the result of his brain damage from his spastic head movements. Cool as they were.
http://www.rollin...-w512164

What a genius.

RIP

Nov 18, 2017
The range of the truck (500 miles) is certainly amazing, but the problem with all electric vehicles remains. The range is not great enough and the down time required for recharge is too long.

There are certainly niche markets where limited range and charge times are not significant such as the person who never plans to leave town and just needs a vehicle for occasional trips around town.

Trucks are expensive devices and are operated for long periods to generate the funds to justify their cost and the cost of their operation. Short range and down time to recharge does not fit well with the economics of over the road transportation. There are uses where the range is not so important and there is sufficient down time already to support the charging, but again, that applies to a narrow market.

I don't expect that this truck in its current form will offer any competition to the long haul trucks now on the road.

Nov 18, 2017
Handling characteristics are nice, but don't really figure into it.
@A_P
i disagree

if a truck steers like a raging bull it's not going to be popular and it will fail to sell

companies absolutely must consider drivers and their comfort (which will include handling) otherwise they don't get drivers
How well the machine handles for the doctor is completely irrelevant in the sales process
not really the same thing

trucking companies also require certain aspects for comfort and security for the driver, which includes handling

again - you can skimp on certain things (like the comfort of a bed in a sleeper) but you can't skimp on certain performance issues in a CDL long-haul vehicle

if ya can't get drivers to use a truck you've just paid for a paperweight, and that's not a good way to make profits

Nov 18, 2017
companies absolutely must consider drivers and their comfort (which will include handling) otherwise they don't get drivers

I think it depends a lot on how easily a company can find another driver. If they can just fire someone who complains and get someone else to do the job then the driver is unlikely to complain in the first place. Not sure ifthere's a shortage of drivers out there.

As I noted: We make stuff used by doctors (who are a pretty well trained bunch - not easily replaced) and not even they have any clout whatsoever in shaping the user friendliness of medical products. That is all up to the manufacturer to do (or not) at their discretion. It doesn't add (or detract) a single dollar to the company's profit to put emphasis on it or not (which drives me up the wall. I think user end-customer usefulness should be number 1).
...but when push comes to shove (i.e. when sales/release deadlines loom) this is one of the first things to go out the window.

Nov 18, 2017
if ya can't get drivers to use a truck you've just paid for a paperweight, and that's not a good way to make profit
"Wal-Mart is planning to test Tesla's electric semitractor-trailer and has preordered 15, the retailer says.
The pilot is planned for the U.S. and Canada.
J.B. Hunt Transport Services announced earlier on Friday it has reserved "multiple" new electric semis just unveiled by Elon Musk."

"A company could save tens of thousands of dollars if the Tesla Semi is, as Musk said, 25 cents cheaper to operate per mile than a standard diesel truck.
The average number of miles driven a year per large truck is just over 100,000, according to industry analysts. That means each Tesla Semi could save a company at least $25,000 a year."

-Just the beginning.

Nov 18, 2017
I think it depends a lot on how easily a company can find another driver
@A_P
yes and no
there are drivers out there, true enough, but a company also considers a drivers history

which is more cost effective? spending a little more on a truck that can be a tax write off or taking any and all drivers with the impending threat of loss of cargo?

losing cargo isn't bad when it's insured, but a company that loses too much cargo tends to go out of business because folk stop using it to transport

it's a fine line
... pretty well trained bunch - not easily replaced) and not even they have any clout whatsoever...
it's still a little different

the driver is much like the equipment you sell to dr's

driver is effective and useful, ya make money

driver isn't comfy and working to full potential because he has to fight to control a vehicle, he is less effective

if this is a trend in trucks, & not drivers, then the truck is replaced
and future trucks not bought

Nov 18, 2017
@A_P cont'd
...but when push comes to shove (i.e. when sales/release deadlines loom) this is one of the first things to go out the window
true of trucking companies to a degree

again, the driver is just like the equipment purchased

here is another way of looking at it:
the truck is equipment, and therefore a business expense
so is the driver

if a truck is "the problem" (ie: drivers don't want to use it because it handles poorly) then it becomes a liability as it's sitting more than working

though drivers can be replaced, you must be concerned with delivery, time, etc

if your selection of drivers is relegated to the poor drivers or high-risk drivers, then you have to consider what will happen to the cargo and therefore your company

it's far easier to keep better drivers with a certain standard of equipment, so you choose equipment based upon what drivers *require*, with the occasional perk put in for incentive


Nov 18, 2017
PS
I think it depends a lot on how easily a company can find another driver. If they can just fire someone who complains and get someone else to do the job then the driver is unlikely to complain in the first place. Not sure ifthere's a shortage of drivers out there
there are a lot of companies that don't care too much about driver safety, security or retention

typically those positions are local and pay-per-load, like:
logging
grain hauling
chicken/hog/cattle/livestock hauling
dump trucks
rock haulers
short range load
delivery services (lumber, furniture, etc)

in this case, handling isn't considered at all because it's low pay and drivers, both good and bad, flock to the position in order to have a local job that doesn't require them to be far from home


Nov 18, 2017
The range of the truck (500 miles) is certainly amazing, but the problem with all electric vehicles remains. The range is not great enough and the down time required for recharge is too long.


The range is enough, any driver will want a period of rest after driving 500 miles anyway. Charging speed and density of supercharger stations still need to improve, tough.

Nov 18, 2017
but he jump-started the Auto Industry toward an electric future


Correction: Panasonic did. Without the batteries, there would be no Tesla. The rest is pretty trivial, as there's no great new engineering going on in putting an electric motor in a car. . .

That's why hailing Tesla as the savior is completely misguided.....


As you do so many times, Eikka, you completely miss the point. Is that dliberate, or are your biases in complete control?

Nov 18, 2017
Eikka
he simply comes up with a new wonder-machine to sell and distract from the failure of the previous one.
Which previous wonder machine that has failed are your referring to Eikka?

Looks like some folks in the trucking industry are suitably impressed to put some money up - https://electrek.co/ I would not refer to any one as the 'saviour', but think Tesla has certainly earned some cred in terms of impacting the world in a very positive way.

Nov 18, 2017
Which previous wonder machine that has failed

PayPal did work out. SpaceX seems to be working out, too. The solar tiles of Solar City were just reported to be sold out through the entirety of 2018. The powerwalls are selling like hotcakes. Sales for the the model S is crushing every other luxury model (almost as much as the next two combined)

...if that is failure then sign me up for some of that.

if his cars would be cheaper than these gasoline ones - but they aren't.

Ya know - this statement has been bugging me for quite some time so I sat down and ran the numbers. Even with the additional 9000EUR for the extended batterypack the model 3 comes out 5000EUR cheaper - over its lifetime - than a comparable car given average use numbers (if you drive more then it gets ever better)

Sales-sticker price is not the only money you spend on a car. You have to look at the total cost of ownership.

Nov 18, 2017
The range is enough, any driver will want a period of rest after driving 500 miles anyway
There are lots of laws limiting drive time between rests. Here's one;

"PROPERTY-CARRYING DRIVERS
11-Hour Driving Limit
May drive a maximum of 11 hours after 10 consecutive hours off duty."
https://www.fmcsa...ulations

-This is why you often see rigs parked in vacant lots and off-ramps... there is often not enough room at truck stops.

Solar charging stations may be a good way of closing this gap.

AI trucks will need no rest, a huge advantage.

Nov 18, 2017
It's a general problem with people that they only consider the price sticker in the shop instead of total money spent on an item. They buy cheap clothes and shoes which fall apart in no time - and have to rebuy over and over again - while quality stuff lasts you basically forever. Same with renting vs. owning a home/apartment. If you crunch the numbers on this you will not believe what kind of money you are spending extra over your lifetime (can exceeed 250k, easily)

In the automotive sector it's especially obvious when you look at motorcycles (cheap japanese vs. some quality brands).
The amount you spend on repairs and replacement parts for the cheap bikes is enormous - and all the while you're riding a cheap bike that's nowhere as much fun as a quality one.

Nov 18, 2017
mackita
But why, when 80%+ energy comes from fossil fuels and this share even rises?
Because we are in the process of changing that - and Tesla is a company at the forefront of developing the options we need in order to wean ourselves off fossil fuels. I imagine (based on your comment) - that you are not concerned about this kind of pollution - https://www.washi...3a2ff040
Many do care. We are collectively exploring options for creating a better world. Tesla is doing some really heavy lifting - and every other car company in the world has now got the message - and is following suit. Just one example - https://cleantech...gy-2022/

Nov 18, 2017
I should weigh in on this as someone with some experience in the industry. If Tesla's truck works as advertised, it's ready to compete in the industry on local and regional, with well defined routes, plus something I call 80 20 OTR: The 20% of otr routes that move 80% of the freight, on backbones that connect major cities, without too much infrastructure change. These trucks are ready. Even a team driving 1500 miles in a day can only run 22 of 24 hours, giving 4 stops of 30 min for 1600 miles of charge, with good planning. The major challenge is in planning software. If Tesla cultivates a partnership with a company that does it and they start utilizing load swaps fully (the status quo does not, I'm talking about two trucks swapping trailers when half the route leaves feasible charging space) you could see a sizable amount of electric trucks on the road soon, but planning software for limited infrastructure is key.

Nov 19, 2017
Even if Wall Street and the established auto companies succeed in bankrupting Tesla, Elon Musk will still be considered one of the most successful men of our time.

Musk is succeeding just fine at doing this himself, in spite of the fact the Wall Street establishment just keeps shoveling billions in his direction.

It's all about the batteries: what sort of power output, capacities, charging speeds;

This is correct, it is the batteries and it would seem as if Musk is on the wrong end of the stick. His lithium-ion gigafactory is a dead dinosaur walking.
http://www.zerohe...a-killer

Nov 19, 2017
cantdrive
it would seem as if Musk is on the wrong end of the stick.
So cantdrive promotes Fisker - a company that simply has an impressive press release - over the company that is producing the model S, model x, model 3 - as well as building out a charging network all over the world. Yes - battery technology is important - you think Tesla is not aware of that? https://electrek....horizon/
Research into battery technology is on steroids right now. There is always the possibility of a breakthrough - undermining current tech. At this point - smart money goes on Tesla - over Fisker - but let's watch the future as it unfolds.

Nov 19, 2017
Nope, not promoting Fisker, just an alternative POV. And no, the smart money doesn't go to Tesla, the smart money is shorting Tesla and it's not-for-profit (apparently) business model with huge cash burn. It would seem as if with the exodus of executives and engineers from Tesla would agree as they can see the writing on the wall.
Personally, I feel as if the established automakers such as Toyota or Honda will eventually dominate EV's just as they dominate conventional autos now. They have a huge advantage to sit back and allow the market to mature and materialize and then pay royalties to those who develop the best tech while using their entrenched manufacturing and marketing as now.

Nov 19, 2017
We have Electric Trains. Why not run under-ocean Hyperloops to near by islands? Advantage of electrification is the lack of pollution from locomotives. Electrification results in higher performance, lower maintenance costs and lower energy costs. Power plants, even if they burn fossil fuels, are far cleaner than mobile sources such as locomotive engines. First electric passenger train was presented by Werner von Siemens at Berlin in 1879. The locomotive was driven by a 2.2 kW, series-wound motor, and the train, consisting of the locomotive and three cars, reached a speed of 13 km/h.

Nov 19, 2017
cantdrive
Nope, not promoting Fisker, just an alternative POV.
You used an article talking about Fisker - in constructing your argument about Tesla. The basis of your argument - is that Fisker's announced battery technology - is going to make Telsa obsolete. You ignore the reality - that Fisker is at this point vapourware. Tesla is building cars, and building recharge infrastructure. Everything is in line with the road map that Musk laid out - years ago. Will Tesla succeed? That is for the future to reveal. I think smart money is on Tesla. The link I gave - shows that Musk is hyper aware of the battery landscape - he is after all an engineer, with an incredible track record. You argument leaks like a sieve. All companies are going to have to deal with the realities of battery developments. Right now - Telsa is leading the charge. I wish them all the best.

Nov 19, 2017
Are all the Electric motor "magnets" made in China?

Nov 22, 2017
We now have our second EV, a 2013 Tesla Model S, P-85. It is "fueled" by our PV panels, like the e-Golf.

The future got here while you all were distracted by Rumpy.

Nov 23, 2017
This is an interesting article on the Tesla truck. It sounds too good to be true ($150k for the base truck). The numbers only make sense if there is some major change in the battery technology. Either Tesla is blowing smoke - or this is a big deal.

https://electrek....c-truck/

Nov 24, 2017
Tesla talked of 30, 40, 50 Levels of Tunnels under the surface of the earth - the reason cited being that ALL buildings (take skyscrapers for example) are 3-D, full of people and The Roads for Cars are only 2-D (Rectangular). So, he says Hyperloops are a must.
Will the Tunnels hold Semi-Trucks, is My Question !

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