US tech giants file brief in favor of Obama 'clean power' plan

April 1, 2016
On Friday, Google, Apple, Microsoft and Amazon filed a brief with the DC Circuit court in support of the program, noting that co
On Friday, Google, Apple, Microsoft and Amazon filed a brief with the DC Circuit court in support of the program, noting that collectively they are among the biggest US consumers of electricity

US tech giants Google, Apple, Microsoft and Amazon expressed support Friday for President Barack Obama's program to fight climate change, which was put on hold in February by the US Supreme Court.

The Environmental Protection Agency's "Clean Power Plan" calls for a 32 percent reduction in CO2 emissions by electric power plants by 2030 from 2005 levels.

A group of 25 US states, most of them led by Republican governors, challenged the program before the Supreme Court which by a 5-4 vote put it on hold until an appeals court can rule on the arguments.

On Friday, Google, Apple, Microsoft and Amazon filed a brief with the DC Circuit court in support of the program, noting that collectively they are among the biggest US consumers of electricity.

The administration's plan "will help address by reinforcing current trends that are making supplies more robust, more reliable and more affordable," the brief said.

The tech giants noted their own efforts to limit the impact of their activities on the environment, in particular by turning toward renewable energy sources for their power needs.

They said the program would help them "power their operations in ways consistent with their environmental commitments and business needs."

"With the plan in place, growth in renewable energy will continue, as electricity generators and sellers will have even more reasons to work with significant purchasers... to develop new approaches that support renewable energy," it said.

In a blog post, Google said: "We are all committed to sourcing our power in a sustainable way, and renewable energy makes good business sense for us all."

Explore further: Obama calls Supreme Court emissions ruling 'unusual'

Related Stories

Obama calls Supreme Court emissions ruling 'unusual'

February 11, 2016

US President Barack Obama said Thursday that the Supreme Court did something "unusual" in freezing a plan to tackle carbon emissions, as he insisted his administration was on firm legal ground.

Supreme Court deals blow to Obama climate plan

February 10, 2016

The US Supreme Court has put on hold a sweeping plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fueled power plants, dealing a significant blow to President Barack Obama's efforts to rein in climate change.

Climate deal will live on, despite US blow: experts

February 13, 2016

In freezing President Barack Obama's plan to tackle carbon emissions, the US Supreme Court delivered a blow to a global climate deal - but experts say that US commitments to the deal will survive.

Recommended for you

Coffee-based colloids for direct solar absorption

March 22, 2019

Solar energy is one of the most promising resources to help reduce fossil fuel consumption and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions to power a sustainable future. Devices presently in use to convert solar energy into thermal ...

EPA adviser is promoting harmful ideas, scientists say

March 22, 2019

The Trump administration's reliance on industry-funded environmental specialists is again coming under fire, this time by researchers who say that Louis Anthony "Tony" Cox Jr., who leads a key Environmental Protection Agency ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

gkam
1.7 / 5 (6) Apr 03, 2016
Industries with intelligent folk know better than managers of brute force industries in previous centuries. But right-wingers have politicized this discussion, so many of the folk opposing the future are here by political prejudice, never having been in any of the industries themselves.

Technical folk are also the ones sufficiently prescient to develop the new technologies for their own uses.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.