What's ahead for Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant

What's ahead for Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant
In this Nov. 12, 2014 file pool photo, a part of the roof of the building covering the Unit 1 reactor is seen removed at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan. Four years after an earthquake and tsunami destroyed the nuclear power plant, the road ahead remains riddled with unknowns. The government approved a revised 30-to-40-year roadmap Friday, June 12, 2015 that delays by three years the start of a key initial step - the removal of still-radioactive used fuel rods in the three reactors that had meltdowns following the March 2011 disaster. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, Pool, File)

Four years after an earthquake and tsunami destroyed Japan's Fukushima nuclear power plant, the road ahead remains riddled with unknowns.

The government approved a revised 30-to-40-year roadmap Friday that delays by three years the start of a key initial step—the removal of still-radioactive fuel rods in the three reactors that had meltdowns following the March 2011 disaster in northeast Japan.

Experts have yet to pinpoint the exact location of the melted fuel inside the three reactors and study it, and still need to develop robots capable of working safely in such highly radioactive conditions. And then there's the question of what to do with the waste.

Some of the uncertainties and questions:

THE FUEL RODS: Kept cool in storage pools on the top floor of each of the three reactors, they need to be removed to free up space for robots and other equipment to go down to the containment chambers. The 1,573 bundles of fuel rods—mostly used but some new—are considered among the highest risks at the plant, because they are uncovered within the reactor building. To remove them, the building roofs must be taken off and replaced with a cover that prevents radioactive dust from flying out. Each building is damaged differently and requires its own cover design and equipment. The government and plant operator TEPCO hope to start the process in 2018, three years later than planned.

What's ahead for Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant
This Nov. 12, 2014 file photo shows water tanks that store contaminated water at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan. The government approved a revised 30-to-40-year roadmap Friday, June 12, 2015 that delays by three years the start of a key initial step - the removal of still-radioactive used fuel rods in the three reactors that had meltdowns following the March 2011 disaster. The plant is still plagued with massive amounts of contaminated water - cooling water that must be added regularly, and subsequently leaks out of the reactors and mixes with groundwater that seeps into the reactor basements. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, Pool, File)

THE MELTED FUEL: Once the spent fuel rods are out of the way, workers can turn their attention to what is expected to be the hardest part of the decommissioning: Removing the melted fuel from the three wrecked reactors. The biggest questions are where the melted fuel is and in what condition. Radiation levels are too high for humans to approach. Based on computer simulations and a few remote-controlled probes, experts believe the melted fuel has breached the cores and fallen to the bottom of the containment chambers, some possibly seeping into the concrete foundation.

A plan to repair the containment chambers and fill them with water so that the melted fuel can be handled while being kept cool may be unworkable, and experts are studying alternatives. How to reach the debris—from the top or from the side—is another question. A vertical approach would require robots and equipment that can dangle as low as 30 meters (90 feet) to reach the bottom. Experts are also trying to figure out how to obtain debris samples to help develop radiation-resistant robots and other equipment that can handle the molten fuel.

What's ahead for Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant
In this Nov. 12, 2014 file photo, workers wearing protective gears stand outside Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant's reactor in Okuma, Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan. Four years after an earthquake and tsunami destroyed the nuclear power plant, the road ahead remains riddled with unknowns. The government approved a revised 30-to-40-year roadmap Friday, June 12, 2015 that delays by three years the start of a key initial step - the removal of still-radioactive used fuel rods in the three reactors that had meltdowns following the March 2011 disaster. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, Pool, File)

CONTAMINATED WATER: The plant is still plagued with massive amounts of contaminated water—cooling water that must be added regularly, and subsequently leaks out of the reactors and mixes with groundwater that seeps into the reactor basements. The volume of water grows by 300 tons daily. TEPCO runs it through treatment machines to remove most radioactive elements, and then stores it in thousands of tanks on the compound. Water leaks pose environmental concerns and health risks to workers. Nuclear experts say controlled release of the treated water into the ocean would be the ultimate solution.

RADIOACTIVE WASTE: Japan currently has no plan for the waste that comes out of the plant. Under the roadmap, the government and TEPCO are supposed to compile a basic plan by March 2018. Waste management is an extremely difficult task that requires developing technology to compact and reduce the toxicity of the waste, while finding a waste storage site is practically impossible considering public sentiment. This raises serious doubts about whether the cleanup can be completed within 40 years.


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Japan OKs long-term Fukushima cleanup plan despite unknowns

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Jun 12, 2015
We currently have NO WAY of dealing with this disaster. None. The fuel and molten reactor vessel are intensely-radioactive, and if you can see it, you are going to die. It kills robots, too, and the instruments we send in to see what is going on.

No other technology does this to us. The toxins in coal are bad, but this is a different matter. Who protects those who come in contact with it after we are gone? Are you sure they understand the signs? Can you guarantee this will remain safely tucked away forever in Human terms? NO, you cannot.

What can we say about the character of those who do this to all the following members of Humanity? Who would do such a thing,and leave it for others to clean up?

What kind of people are these??

Jun 12, 2015
We currently have NO WAY of dealing with this disaster.
No one died from Fukusima radiation. Natural tsunami is that was the real killer.

But on the other side:
"Wind Energy Has Killed More Americans Than Nuclear"
http://newsbuster...-nuclear
"1,500 accidents and incidents on UK wind farms "
http://www.telegr...rms.html
http://www.forbes...-humans/

Jun 12, 2015
It is time we told the nuke fanatics they get to produce no more of this deadly waste until they can show us they can safely store the mountains of high-level waste they already made.

They readily admit they have no way to deal with Fukushima now. None.

Jun 12, 2015
It is time we told the nuke fanatics they get to produce no more of this deadly waste until they can show us they can safely store the mountains of high-level waste they already made.

They readily admit they have no way to deal with Fukushima now. None.
Say arent you the guy who claimed that radioactive waste was all one thing that contaminated everything it touched?

Sure you are. What makes you think that similar opinions on nuclear tech have any value whatsoever?

They dont. Youve ruined the reputation of george kamburoff
http://www.kamburoff.com/

-by the dismal quality of the things you post.

Jun 12, 2015
It is time we told the nuke fanatics they get to produce no more of this deadly waste until they can show us they can safely store the mountains of high-level waste they already made.

They readily admit they have no way to deal with Fukushima now. None.
As usual youre a LIAR.

"Japan's government approved Friday a revised 30- to 40-year roadmap to clean up the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant, but many questions remain.

"The plan, endorsed by Cabinet members and officials, delays the start of a key initial step — the removal of spent fuel in storage pools at each of the three melted reactors — by up to three years due to earlier mishaps and safety problems at the plant."

-You do realize that what little impact you will ever have here will all be negative due to the fact that you present yourself as a bullshit artist who is willing to LIE and invent facts to further his cause?

Jun 12, 2015
While this concerns US, it is still on topic.
The US has forbidden ranchers from selling beef on the hoof directly from the ranch. It certainly would make economic sense for the small selective rancher.
Did you know the reason we first began to collect cattle into lots to 'finish' them may have had a different reason than the one you think. Did you know graining them reduces the grass residues which just may have then __possibly now--included radiation from all the air tests the US conducted out west?

Jun 13, 2015
Nuclear technology kills us little by little. The radiation affects us daily, and any more is harmful. So why do we use coal and nuclear technologies which spread it all around?

The goobers who run the Japanese nuclear cabal have great plans, . . but nothing else. They do not even have the technology to do the work!! It still has to be invented, if possible.

Meanwhile, the corium of three reactors is still seething down there somewhere, having melted everything in its path so far. If it reaches the water table and explodes into the air, we are done.

Jun 13, 2015
What should be ahead of the entire nuke industry is a way to actually safely store the nasty stuff they create. What kind of people do this to their descendants?

What kind of character deficiency has us load our own self-created disasters onto all of the rest of Humanity?

Who does this?

Jun 13, 2015
The radiation affects us daily, and any more is harmful.
In this way, all form of life on Earth should be died because of natural radiation from potassium, uranium and thorium, present everywhere including bloody wind farms.
"What Keeps the Earth Cooking?"
https://newscente...utrinos/
"Radioactive decay is key ingredient behind Earth's heat"
http://phys.org/n...rth.html

"Sea bird halts London Array wind farm expansion"
http://www.bbc.co...26258271

gkam seems to be paid by the 'renewable mafia' for spreading his anti-science bullshit.


Jun 15, 2015
Fukushima no doubt will take a while to clean up.

But now some comments on comments:
1) All that radiation just can't knock out radiation hardened equipment (unless its very poorly designed). Many spacecraft had endured way more radiation around Jupiter and they didn't malfunction. So anything else is bullshit.
2) There is no way for any radioactive decay within the magnets in any windmill to cause any radioactivity downwind of any consequence. A bigger danger may be the off-gassing of volatiles from the chemicals used to make the windmill itself.
3) How exactly is nuclear technology killing us little by little every day? Using the eleventh dimension? Micro wormholes? Osmosis from a distance? Telepathically per chance? Quantify it absolutely for me! Otherwise its just propaganda and grandstanding.

Jun 15, 2015
4) Corium! OMG! It's gonna blow the place up. Aaaaaagh!! .... Um ... ya, right. If it were to do that it would have happened in the first 12 to 24 hours of loss of control of the reactors. It would be fair to say that it is now sufficiently diluted with concrete and metals to not do that.
5) All those "mountains" of nuclear waste are surprisingly miniscule compared to the mountains of highly dangerous chemical waste sitting in metal drums in various dump sites around the planet. Some of which is sufficient to kill the entire population of the Earth many times over.

So let's try to keep it real. We shouldn't be making decisions just based on delusions, paranoia and fear mongering.

Jun 15, 2015
"So let's try to keep it real. We shouldn't be making decisions just based on delusions, paranoia and fear mongering."
------------------------------------

Nor ignorance and corporate propaganda.

And while you may find it humorous, the Japanese do not. Neither do those who live near Hanford. And perhaps you are unaware of the volume of this nasty stuff.

Mountains of chemical waste can be neutralized: Radiation cannot. I think you need a reality check.

Jun 15, 2015
"Japan Times:

Radiation inside the reactor 2 containment vessel at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant has reached a lethal 73 sieverts per hour and any attempt to send robots in to accurately gauge the situation will require them to have greater resistance than currently available, experts said Wednesday.

Exposure to 73 sieverts for a minute would cause nausea and seven minutes would cause death within a month, Tokyo Electric Power Co. said."

Jun 15, 2015
..can be neutralized: Radiation cannot...
"Scientists discover a bacterium that 'breathes' uranium and renders it immobile"
"This bacterium can breathe either oxygen or uranium to drive the chemical reactions that provide life-giving energy."
http://phys.org/n...ile.html
Radiation exists in a natural way on Earth everywhere anytime. Go to a safer planet, gkam.

Jun 15, 2015
Willie and Mr Ed are going in to SAVE US!

Aren't they?

Jun 15, 2015
".. a lethal 73 sieverts per hour.. will require them to have greater resistance .. experts said Wednesday.
Exposure to 73 sieverts for a minute would cause nausea and seven minutes would cause death within a month.."
In this logic (gkam scaremonger): radioactive particles emitted by wind farms, that use rare-earth metals with natural traces of uranium (4.270 MeV) and thorium, can cause disorientation, as well lung cancer, on birds preventing them from dodging the slaughtering wind blades.


Jun 15, 2015
"In two areas, the tests found levels at 25 Sieverts (Sv) per hour and about 15 Sieverts per hour, the Tokyo Electric Power Company said.

The specific areas were a 120-metre tall ventilation pipe and at a duct that connects the reactor buildings."
-----------------------------------------

That stack is 400 feet tall!!

Why does a "clean" powerplant need to send stuff up that high to get it away from us? What do you think is in that stuff?

Will Willie tell us?

Jun 15, 2015
"In two areas, the tests found levels at 25 Sieverts (Sv) per hour and about 15 Sieverts per hour, the Tokyo Electric Power Company said.
The specific areas were a 120-metre tall ventilation pipe and at a duct that connects the reactor buildings."
However, it is shielded by thick radiation protection; for comparison, while in some places, the Earth's natural radioactivity reaches up to 800 mSv/a, nearby Fukushima no more than 20 mSv/a; furthermore, no one died from Fukushima radiation.
On the other side, wind farms that occupy several acres and have traces of radioactive uranium and thorium within thin fuselages, should be decommissioned as soon as possible in order to avoid lung cancer cases.

Jun 15, 2015
Willie, do you know the difference between 7 Sieverts/hr and 800 mSv/a?

Look it up, and get embarrassed.

Jun 15, 2015
..do you know the difference between 7 Sieverts/hr and 800 mSv/a?
Do you know the difference between thousands degrees inside a furnace and tens degrees outside the furnace? Thermal radiation insulation/shielding, dissipation inverse-square law 1/r².
http://hyperphysi....html#c4

Jun 15, 2015
Nuclear technology kills us little by little. The radiation affects us daily, and any more is harmful. So why do we use coal and nuclear technologies which spread it all around?
Perhaps this might explain your gradual descent into dementia?

Or perhaps it has little to do with radiation.
http://www.aplace...elderly/
Willie, do you know the difference between 7 Sieverts/hr and 800 mSv/a?
-This from the guy who thinks that radioactive material is all one thing that contaminates everything it touches.

This from the guy who didnt know that radiation doses of sufficient intensity could kill within minutes.

Look it up, and get embarrassed.

Jun 15, 2015
800 mSv/a = 90Sv/h Natural radiation on a monazite beach near Guarapari, Brazil.[49]

Those are MICROsieverts, Toots.

You get a lethal dose (many Sieverts) in a few minutes at Fuskushima, standing near the huge exhaust stacks, . . . which should be unneeded for "clean" energy.

BTW, did you read all the dangers and the nasty stuff this does to you above these rates in Wiki?

Jun 15, 2015
..standing near the huge exhaust stacks...
Poor gkam, elder gradual descent into dementia.
Why will someone stand near the exhaust stacks? It is the same to ask someone to stay inside a thousands degrees furnace while outside is safely protected by thermal shielding, or ask somebody to jump off a ten floors building.
Illogical.

Jun 15, 2015
The site would not accept the micro (mu), signifying microseiverts, so it reads 90 Sieverts.

It is microsieverts.

Jun 15, 2015
The stacks at the coal plant in Saskatchewan are 300 feet tall, to carry away the pollutants to somewhere else. That's a poor-quality coal plant. Why would a nuclear a "clean" facility need even taller ones?

Twenty minutes standing by one gives you a lethal dose, Willie. Go show us how safe it really is.

Jun 15, 2015
"gradual descent into dementia" ... ha ha , good one! ..... (might be a follower of the poison contrails club too)
Willie nilly seems a little misguided also.

what else ....
- Robot can't handle 73 Sv/h? What piece of junk are they using? Now if it was 7300 Sv/h , then maybe.
- Stacks 400 ft high. True, seems a bit high. Even the turbine building stack is 400 ft. The average elsewhere is generally only 30 to 50 ft higher than the building it's venting. Must be a Japanese thing.

Jun 19, 2015
Mr Ed is going to save them, because he is so much smarter than they.

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