Video: Why don't we recycle Styrofoam?

May 18, 2015, American Chemical Society
Credit: The American Chemical Society

You might be eating your lunch out of one right now, or eating your lunch with one right now. Polystyrene containers and utensils are found throughout the foodservice industry.

The products are recyclable, so why does so much of this material end up in a , and why have so many cities banned its use? Sophia Cai has the answers in this week's Speaking of Chemistry.

Check it out here:

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