Video: Why 'hypoallergenic' isn't a thing

March 19, 2015
Credit: American Chemical Society

It's a simple claim made on thousands of personal care products for adults and kids: hypoallergenic. But what does that actually mean? Turns out, it can mean whatever manufacturers want it to mean, and that can leave you feeling itchy.

Speaking of Chemistry is back this week with Sophia Cai explaining why "hypoallergenic" isn't really a thing.

Check it out :

Explore further: Is the label 'hypoallergenic' helpful or just marketing hype?

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