Less privileged kids shine at university, according to study

Less privileged kids shine at university, according to study

Australia's higher education system appeared to level the playing field in terms of academic achievement for students, regardless of their socio-economic status (SES) background, according to a new study.

The study, "Socio-economic Status of Schools and University Academic Performance: Implications for Australia's Higher Education Expansion", by Assistant Professor Ian Li from the School of Population Health at The University of Western Australia and Associate Professor Michael Dockery from the National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education at Curtin University focused on the role of schools' SES in determining academic performance at university.

They study authors found that increased participation by from lower SES backgrounds was possible without compromising academic standards and suggested that as students from low SES backgrounds were under-represented in higher education, their participation should be encouraged.

While prior was found to be a strong determinant of university , a student's personal SES background did not influence their university performance. Another key finding was that neither the sector, nor resources, impact on students' academic scores.

"These findings imply that larger amounts of funding per student are not being translated into better outcomes at university, though there are probably variations in resources, such as teacher quality, that were not observable in the study," Assistant Professor Li said. "The study also found that female students strongly outperformed male students in their first year of university, that older students tended to achieve higher marks, and that students from co-ed schools performed better than students who went to all-boy or all-girl high schools."

The study's sample population consisted of 8,417 first-year undergraduate students at an Australian university, from 183 schools. Latest figures from the Australian Government Department of Education indicate that the proportion of low SES students enrolled in in 2013 was approximately 17 per cent.


Explore further

School environment affects teacher expectations of their students

More information: Li, I. W. and Dockery, A. M. (2014). Socio-economic Status of Schools and University Academic Performance: Implications for Australia's Higher Education Expansion. National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education (NCSEHE), Perth: Curtin University. www.ncsehe.edu.au/publications … cademic-performance/
Citation: Less privileged kids shine at university, according to study (2014, December 19) retrieved 15 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-12-privileged-kids-university.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

cjn
Dec 24, 2014
@daniel

I think the "poor" kids in the study that attended university were likely amongst the most intelligent of that population, where it was understood by themselves or their family that a few years of financial hardship now will pay dividends in the future. Unlike the kids from the higher SES, which would have found their way into University regardless of their academic merit.

FTA:
They study authors found that increased participation by students from lower SES backgrounds was possible without compromising academic standards and suggested that as students from low SES backgrounds were under-represented in higher education, their participation should be encouraged.


Of course they don't want more academically prepared students, just more lower SES students. I'm not sure what else I expected from a set of authors who set out with this bias in mind.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more