COVID curriculum brings science home for high school students

When the pandemic sent many students home, University of Arizona researchers and Tucson teachers quickly adapted to the challenges of teaching science without a lab or classroom. A new paper, published in the journal The ...

Deciphering the mysteries of enigmatic fungi

Few things alive on Earth occupy as little of our brain space as fungi. The vast majority of these organisms—neither plant nor animal—are invisibly small or perpetually hidden underneath our feet. Only when mushrooms ...

New theories and materials aid the transition to clean energy

With each passing day, the dark side of our addiction to fossil fuels becomes more apparent. In addition to slashing emissions of carbon dioxide, society must find sustainable alternatives to power the modern world.

Long-term experiment shows warming slows microbes' growth

In a first-of-its-kind warming experiment, researchers at Northern Arizona University found that microbes growth rate decreased over 15 years of warming. The research, published this week in Global Change Biology, showed ...

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Student

The word student is etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb "studēre", meaning "to direct one's zeal at"; hence a student could be described as 'one who directs zeal at a subject'. In its widest use, "student" is used for anyone who is learning.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA