US unveils changes to attract foreign science, tech students

The Biden administration on Friday announced policy changes to attract international students specializing in science, technology, engineering and math—part of the broader effort to make the U.S. economy more competitive.

Exploring fish flow from fisheries to supper

Recent breakthroughs in multiple fields of study now allow researchers to follow the entire life cycle of ocean fishes—from when and where they are spawned, to where they disperse and grow, to when and where they are captured, ...

'Lab on a chip' can measure protein-DNA interactions

New nanophotonic tweezers developed by Cornell researchers can fit on a chip less than one-inch square, making it easier and more efficient to manipulate single molecules using light in order to investigate biological systems.

When people 'click' they respond faster to each other

When two people are on the same page in a conversation, sometimes their minds just "click." A Dartmouth study demonstrates that clicking isn't just a figure of speech but is predicted by "response times" in a conversation ...

Uncovering evidence for an internal ocean in small Saturn moon

A Southwest Research Institute scientist set out to prove that the tiny, innermost moon of Saturn was a frozen inert satellite and instead discovered compelling evidence that Mimas has a liquid internal ocean. In the waning ...

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Science

Science (from the Latin scientia, meaning "knowledge") refers to any systematic knowledge-base or prescriptive practice that is capable of resulting in a prediction or predictable type of outcome. In this sense, science may refer to a highly skilled technique or practice.

In its more restricted contemporary sense, science refers to a system of acquiring knowledge based on scientific method, and to the organized body of knowledge gained through such research. This article focuses on the more restricted use of the word. Science as discussed in this article is sometimes called experimental science to differentiate it from applied science—the application of scientific research to specific human needs—although the two are often interconnected.

Science is a continuing effort to discover and increase human knowledge and understanding through disciplined research. Using controlled methods, scientists collect observable evidence of natural or social phenomena, record measurable data relating to the observations, and analyze this information to construct theoretical explanations of how things work. The methods of scientific research include the generation of hypotheses about how phenomena work, and experimentation that tests these hypotheses under controlled conditions. Scientists are also expected to publish their information so other scientists can do similar experiments to double-check their conclusions. The results of this process enable better understanding of past events, and better ability to predict future events of the same kind as those that have been tested.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA