Experts warn Germany will miss electric car target

Germany looks set to fail in its ambitious plan to put a million electric cars on the road by 2020.

An has warned that only half the target number will be achieved unless the government spends millions to make electric cars more attractive to buyers.

The panel—made up of experts from industry, science and politics—said in a report Tuesday that the government should invest more money in research and development, and let businesses deduct half the purchase price of electric cars from tax.

At present, just 24,000 electric cars are registered in Germany.

Daily Die Welt reported Tuesday that the government plans to place 400 charging stations along Germany's Autobahn network to ensure can travel the length and breadth of the country.


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Citation: Experts warn Germany will miss electric car target (2014, December 2) retrieved 22 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-12-experts-germany-electric-car.html
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Dec 03, 2014
Hardly, even if the German Government will subsidy the construction of needed infrastructure or give fiscal benefits to electric car owners, this will only eventually trick the consumers. Because it can not hide the main problems of electric: takes to much to charge, has the autonomy too low, maintenance cost and also purchase cost are way above the average car index.
Not to mention that the offer of vehicles that are within working parameters (brand new and second hand) exceeds the regional market demand.
I read about new techs and breakthroughs in the field but i think it will take several years before that can prove their viability....

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