Broadband and ultrathin polarization manipulators developed

December 4, 2014, The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)
Concept of broadband and ultrathin polarization manipulators. Credit: Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

A research team in South Korea has developed a technology that can manipulate a polarized light in broadband operation with the use of a metamaterial.

Professor Bumki Min from the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) has led the research and it is expected that this technology will lead to a development of optical devices that can be applied to broadband communication and display.

When an object or its structure is analyzed by using a polarized light such as a laser, the results are generally affected by the polarization state of the light. Therefore, in an optics laboratory, the light is polarized with various methods.

In such cases, wave plates or photoactive materials are usually implemented. However, the performance of these devices are vastly dependent on the , and so they are not suitable to be used as a polarizer especially in broadband.

There were many attempts to make artificial materials that are very photoactive by using matematerials which have a strong resonance. Nonetheless, because the materials had an unavoidable dispersion in the resonance frequency, they were not adequate for a broadband operation.

Professor Min's research team arranged and connected helical metamaterials that are smaller than the wavelength of a light. They theoretically and experimentally verified that a can be constantly rotated regardless of the wavelength by super thin that has thickness less than one-tenth of the wavelength of the light. The experiment to confirm the theory was done in the microwave band.

Broadband polarized rotational 3D metamaterials were found to be rotating the polarized microwave within the range of 0.1 GHz to 40GHz by 45 degrees regardless of its frequency. Such nondispersive property is quite unnatural because it is difficult to find a material that does not change in a wide band.

Along with this, the research team materialized the broadband nondispersive polarized rotational property by designing the metamaterial in a way that it has chirality, which determines the number of rotation proportional to the wavelength.

Professor Min said, "As the technology is able to manipulate ultrathin polarization of in broadband, it will lead to the creation of ultra-shallow broadband optical devices."

The research findings were published online in the November 17th issue of Nature Communications.

Explore further: Plasmon-enhanced Polarization-selective filter

Related Stories

Plasmon-enhanced Polarization-selective filter

July 17, 2014

As we all know, some optical devices can only work with a certain incident polarization direction. In this case, a polarizer is necessary to shift the polarization direction of linearly polarized light. A common polarizer ...

Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics

June 6, 2013

(Phys.org) —New ultrathin, planar, lightweight, and broadband polarimetric photonic devices and optics could result from recent research by a team of Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists. The advances would boost security ...

Recommended for you

Scientists produce 3-D chemical maps of single bacteria

November 16, 2018

Scientists at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory—have used ultrabright x-rays to image single bacteria ...

Quantum science turns social

November 15, 2018

Researchers in a lab at Aarhus University have developed a versatile remote gaming interface that allowed external experts as well as hundreds of citizen scientists all over the world to optimize a quantum gas experiment ...

Bursting bubbles launch bacteria from water to air

November 15, 2018

Wherever there's water, there's bound to be bubbles floating at the surface. From standing puddles, lakes, and streams, to swimming pools, hot tubs, public fountains, and toilets, bubbles are ubiquitous, indoors and out.

Terahertz laser pulses amplify optical phonons in solids

November 15, 2018

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg/Germany presents evidence of the amplification of optical phonons ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.