Nature Communications is a bimonthly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Nature Publishing Group since 2010. The editor in chief is Lesley Anson. It is multidisciplinary in scope, with coverage that includes all topics in physics, chemistry, and biology. The online-only journal is specifically designed to fill in gaps for research articles where there is no dedicated journal available in the Nature Publishing Group journals. For example coverage of this journal includes developmental biology, plant sciences, microbiology, ecology and evolution, palaeontology and astronomy. Cross-disciplinary research such as biophysics, bioengineering, chemical physics and environmental science, are also published. However, all cross-disciplinary works are considered for publication.

Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Country
United Kingdom
History
2010-present
Website
http://www.nature.com/ncomms/index.html

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Dynamic twists and loops can enable DNA to modulate its function

When people think of DNA, they visualize a string-like double helix structure. In reality, the DNA double helix in cells is supercoiled and constrained into loops. This supercoiling and looping are known to influence every ...

Answering a century-old question on the origins of life

The missing link isn't a not-yet-discovered fossil, after all. It's a tiny, self-replicating globule called a coacervate droplet, developed by two researchers in Japan to represent the evolution of chemistry into biology.

Political bias on social media emerges from users, not platform

In this era of political polarization, many accuse online social media platforms such as Twitter of liberal bias, intentionally favoring and amplifying liberal content and users while suppressing other political content.

When organoids meet coronaviruses

Researchers from the group of Hans Clevers in collaboration with the group of Bart Haagmans (Erasmus MC) established an organoid biobank to search for the genes that are essential for the spreading of a SARS-CoV2 infection. ...

When a chromosome is lost: How do human cells react to monosomy?

Human cells are usually diploid—they contain two sets of chromosome. Cells in which one chromosome is missing from the duplicated chromosome set are generally not viable. For a long time, the mechanisms responsible for ...

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