Nature Communications is a bimonthly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Nature Publishing Group since 2010. The editor in chief is Lesley Anson. It is multidisciplinary in scope, with coverage that includes all topics in physics, chemistry, and biology. The online-only journal is specifically designed to fill in gaps for research articles where there is no dedicated journal available in the Nature Publishing Group journals. For example coverage of this journal includes developmental biology, plant sciences, microbiology, ecology and evolution, palaeontology and astronomy. Cross-disciplinary research such as biophysics, bioengineering, chemical physics and environmental science, are also published. However, all cross-disciplinary works are considered for publication.

Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Country
United Kingdom
History
2010-present
Website
http://www.nature.com/ncomms/index.html

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'Missing ice problem' finally solved

During glacial periods, the sea level falls, because vast quantities of water are stored in the massive inland glaciers. To date, however, computer models have been unable to reconcile sea-level height with the thickness ...

A new way to look for life-sustaining planets

It is now possible to capture images of planets that could potentially sustain life around nearby stars, thanks to advances reported by an international team of astronomers in the journal Nature Communications.

New 'metalens' shifts focus without tilting or moving

Polished glass has been at the center of imaging systems for centuries. Their precise curvature enables lenses to focus light and produce sharp images, whether the object in view is a single cell, the page of a book, or a ...

Engineering the boundary between 2-D and 3-D materials

In recent years, engineers have found ways to modify the properties of some "two- dimensional" materials, which are just one or a few atoms thick, by stacking two layers together and rotating one slightly in relation to the ...

Scientists identify how harmless gut bacteria 'turn bad'

An international team of scientists has determined how harmless E. coli gut bacteria in chickens can easily pick up the genes required to evolve to cause a life-threatening infection. Their study, published in Nature Communications, ...

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