Nature Communications is a bimonthly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Nature Publishing Group since 2010. The editor in chief is Lesley Anson. It is multidisciplinary in scope, with coverage that includes all topics in physics, chemistry, and biology. The online-only journal is specifically designed to fill in gaps for research articles where there is no dedicated journal available in the Nature Publishing Group journals. For example coverage of this journal includes developmental biology, plant sciences, microbiology, ecology and evolution, palaeontology and astronomy. Cross-disciplinary research such as biophysics, bioengineering, chemical physics and environmental science, are also published. However, all cross-disciplinary works are considered for publication.

Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Country
United Kingdom
History
2010-present
Website
http://www.nature.com/ncomms/index.html

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Tracking proteins in the heart of cells

Cells must provide their internal organelles with all the energy elements they need, which are formed in the Golgi apparatus, the center of maturation and redistribution of lipids and proteins. But how do the proteins that ...

Key enzymes for synthesizing natural products

Plants, fungi and bacteria produce natural products that function as defenses that are deployed against predators and competitors. In medicine, these compounds have such applications as antibiotics, cancer drugs and cholesterol ...

New quantum theory heats up thermodynamic research

Researchers have developed a new quantum version of a 150-year-old thermodynamical thought experiment that could pave the way for the development of quantum heat engines.

Species evolve heat tolerance more slowly than cold tolerance

Many species might be left vulnerable in the face of climate change, unable to adapt their physiologies to respond to rapid global warming. According to a team of international researchers, species evolve heat tolerance more ...

'PopDel' detects deletions in our genomes

The human genome contains roughly three million letters and is distributed over 46 chromosomes. Yet the genetic variation from person to person is very small: the genome sequences of any two people differ from each other ...

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