Newport, Ore., to host wave energy test site

January 16, 2013

Newport, Ore., has been selected as the site for what its backers call a utility-scale wave energy test site.

The city on Oregon's central coast beat out Reedsport to the south for what's called the Pacific Marine Energy Center.

A statement from Oregon State University says the facility at a site yet to be selected about five miles from shore will test devices for generating potential and environmental impacts. Completion is expected to take several years.

Plans call for four "test berths"—open spaces of water dedicated to testing individual devices or small arrays of devices. Cables are to transmit power to the and data to scientists and engineers onshore.

The center is a project of a partnership, funded substantially by federal dollars, between Oregon State and the University of Washington.

Explore further: Boost for wave energy: half the Wave Hub berths now filled

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