New type of home furnace to be introduced

There's a new fad starting, which might eventually prove to be more a revolution than a fad: an efficient furnace that also generates electricity.

The "micro-combined-heat-and-power" units, or CHPs, turns natural gas into hot water and generates up to $800 a year in electricity, the Christian Science Monitor reported Tuesday.

Factories and other industrial facilities have used large CHP systems for years. Home heating systems producing 1 kilowatt of electricity, as well as bigger units that generate about 4 kilowatts are available in Europe and Japan and are expected to make their commercial U.S. debut next month, The Monitor said.

At least five companies are building micro-CHP systems worldwide. In the United States, Marathon Engine Systems of East Troy, Wis., plans to bring a 4-kilowatt hot-water system to the United States next year. Climate Energy of Medfield, Mass., has developed a forced-hot-air system that links a high-efficiency furnace with a Honda quiet generator.

The Micro-CHP units cost up to $20,000 including installation, with an estimated payback period on the initial investment of 3 to 7 years, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International


Explore further

Repulsion mechanism between neurons governs fly brain structure

Citation: New type of home furnace to be introduced (2006, November 14) retrieved 21 September 2020 from https://phys.org/news/2006-11-home-furnace.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments