Israeli police probe hi-tech info theft

May 25, 2006

Israel police investigators have detained a man suspected of stealing hi-tech secrets from his employer during the goodbye bash the company threw him.

Investigators from the National Fraud Unit refused to identify the company or the 31-year-old Givatayim resident they were holding, according to a report in the Israeli business magazine Globes.

The man had reportedly resigned from his position in the company after finding a better job.

Police did reveal that the man had been "one of the pillars of programming at the company," the report said. The investigators told the newspaper they believe he wrote the program to collect sensitive company information for use at his next job as his co-workers organized his farewell party.

"The program even included an order for sending the information collected from the company's computers to an overseas storage server," the report said.

The man, who told police he just wanted a copy of what he'd worked on, was also close friends with the company's chief executive officer, according to the report.

The company discovered the security breach quickly, and the CEO even asked the suspect to help locate the break-in, but the man allegedly used this opportunity to erase his program and tell his boss it had been an outside job, the report said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Watching others play video games is the new spectator sport

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Scientist exposes new world of forensic analysis

Aug 15, 2014

Over the past 20 years DNA evidence has become the foundation upon which forensic investigation is built. The identification of traces of blood, saliva and other bodily fluids places a suspect directly at ...

Google defends child porn tip-offs to police

Aug 05, 2014

Google defended its policy of electronically monitoring its users' content for child sexual abuse after it tipped off police in Texas to a child pornography suspect.

US pushing local police to be mum on surveillance

Jun 12, 2014

The Obama administration has been quietly advising local police not to disclose details about surveillance technology they are using to sweep up basic cellphone data from entire neighborhoods, The Associated ...

Pinpointing climate change uncertainty

Jun 09, 2014

The National Climate Assessment, released recently by the White House, describes a troubling array of climate woes currently affecting the United States—from intense droughts and heat waves to more extreme precipitation ...

Recommended for you

Watching others play video games is the new spectator sport

5 hours ago

As the UK's largest gaming festival, Insomnia, wrapped up its latest event on August 25, I watched a short piece of BBC Breakfast news reporting from the festival. The reporter and some of the interviewees appeared baff ...

SHORE facial analysis spots emotions on Google Glass

22 hours ago

One of the key concerns about facial recognition software has been over privacy. The very idea of having tracking mechanisms as part of an Internet-connected wearable would be likely to upset many privacy ...

Does your computer know how you're feeling?

Aug 22, 2014

Researchers in Bangladesh have designed a computer program that can accurately recognize users' emotional states as much as 87% of the time, depending on the emotion.

User comments : 0