New antibacterial material for bandages, food packaging, shoes

Jul 21, 2010
A new form of paper made of super-thin sheets of carbon could help fight disease-causing bacteria in applications ranging from anti-bacterial bandages to food packaging. Credit: ACS Nano

A new form of paper with the built-in ability to fight disease-causing bacteria could have applications that range from anti-bacterial bandages to food packaging that keeps food fresher longer to shoes that ward off foot odor. A report about the new material, which consists of the thinnest possible sheets of carbon, appears in ACS Nano.

Chunhai Fan, Qing Huang, and colleagues explained that scientists in the United Kingdom first discovered the material, known as , in 2004. Since then, the race has been on to find commercial and industrial uses for graphene. Scientists have tried to use graphene in , computer chips, and . Fan and Huang decided to see how graphene affects living cells.

So they made sheets of paper from graphene oxide, and then tried to grow bacteria and human cells on top. Bacteria were unable to grow on the paper, and it had little adverse effect on human cells. "Given the superior antibacterial effect of graphene oxide and the fact that it can be mass-produced and easily processed to make freestanding and flexible paper with low-cost, we expect this new carbon nanomaterial may find important environmental and clinical applications," the reports states.

Explore further: How we can substitute critical raw materials in catalysis, electronics and photonics

More information: "Graphene-Based Antibacterial Paper", ACS Nano.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

A huge step toward mass production of graphene

Mar 10, 2010

Scientists have leaped over a major hurdle in efforts to begin commercial production of a form of carbon that could rival silicon in its potential for revolutionizing electronics devices ranging from supercomputers ...

A 'huge step' toward mass production of graphene

Jun 09, 2010

Scientists have leaped over a major hurdle in efforts to begin commercial production of a form of carbon that could rival silicon in its potential for revolutionizing electronics devices ranging from supercomputers ...

Super-thin carbon sheets poised to revolutionize electronics

Mar 02, 2009

Super-thin films of carbon with exotic properties, now taking the scientific world by storm, may soon mean a new era of brighter, faster, and smaller computers, smart phones, and other consumer electronics. Brighter digital ...

Recommended for you

Semiconductor miniaturisation with 2D nanolattices

Feb 26, 2015

A European research project has made an important step towards the further miniaturisation of nanoelectronics, using a highly-promising new material called silicene. Its goal: to make devices of the future ...

Magnetic nanoparticles enhance performance of solar cells

Feb 25, 2015

Magnetic nanoparticles can increase the performance of solar cells made from polymers - provided the mix is right. This is the result of an X-ray study at DESY's synchrotron radiation source PETRA III. Adding ...

Researchers enable solar cells to use more sunlight

Feb 25, 2015

Scientists of the University of Luxembourg and of the Japanese electronics company TDK report progress in photovoltaic research: they have improved a component that will enable solar cells to use more energy of the sun and ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.