How to explore inaccessible places by swarms of sensors

Since the dawn of humankind, exploration of certain places, ranging from the depths of the oceans to the edges of the universe, has led to numerous discoveries. However, there are also several environments that need to be ...

Synthetic biologists hack bacterial sensors

Rice University synthetic biologists have hacked bacterial sensing with a plug-and-play system that could be used to mix-and-match tens of thousands of sensory inputs and genetic outputs. The technology has wide-ranging implications ...

Single molecule magnet used as a scanning magnetometer

A team of researchers from the University of California and Fudan University has developed a way to use a single molecule magnet as a scanning magnetometer. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group outlines ...

Impact of carbon dioxide leakage through North Sea wells

Realistic estimates show that global warming can only be kept below 1.5 or two degrees Celsius if carbon dioxide is actively removed from the atmosphere. Storage beneath the seafloor is an option that has been investigated ...

Blood and sweat take training app to the next level

Last year about 1,000 runners were forced to quit the Stockholm Marathon due to extreme hot temperatures and the difficulty in staying hydrated. Researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology have developed a multifaceted ...

page 1 from 23

Sensor

A sensor is a device that measures a physical quantity and converts it into a signal which can be read by an observer or by an instrument. For example, a mercury thermometer converts the measured temperature into expansion and contraction of a liquid which can be read on a calibrated glass tube. A thermocouple converts temperature to an output voltage which can be read by a voltmeter. For accuracy, all sensors need to be calibrated against known standards.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA