Sony Develops Wireless Chip Connections

Apr 06, 2010 by John Messina weblog

(PhysOrg.com) -- Sony has recently developed a wireless chip alternative to today’s chips that use conventional pin connections. This sets new limits on how small an electronic device can be.

By using millimeter wave technology, operating in the 30 to 300 GHz spectrum, a short-range link can be established between devices. Sony has already tested a 40-nanometer CMOS and achieved transfer speeds of 11 gigabits per second operating at 56 GHz over a distance of 14 millimeters.

By moving data between chips, with wireless technology, allows for simpler substrates and IC packaging. Wireless also enhances the reliability of movable and detachable components in certain products.

Sony’s system incorporates a free-running transmitter and an injection lock system. The injection lock system allows the receiver frequency to lock-in (synchronized) with the transmitter’s frequency. This eliminates the need to employ a phase-lock loop approach that is generally used for synchronization.

Injection lock system is used in the receiver to synchronize it to the transmitter frequency. This eliminates the need for phase-lock loop system that uses more power and takes up additional space. Credit: Sony Corp.

Sony will be rolling out their in phases. The first phase will be to enhance the reliability of movable and detachable components and for data transfer between printed circuit boards. Phase two incorporates the technology into chip packages. In phase three Sony will integrated directly into system-on-chip devices that will roll out into their consumer product line.

Sony envisions the elimination of pins and wiring that will allow for a clutter free circuit board. The technology is still being refined and no commercialization dates have been announced. Sony has stated, "the potential to launch it within three years is strong. Once we are satisfied with the layout and performance, then we can start production immediately."

Explore further: DARPA technology identifies counterfeit microelectronics

Related Stories

Sony Launches Short-Range Wireless Technology (w/ Video)

Feb 08, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- The first compliant products, that will use Sony’s TransferJet technology, will start appearing in products as early as the spring of this year. Its design will enable file swapping, between ...

Recommended for you

New frontier in error-correcting codes

35 minutes ago

Error-correcting codes are one of the glories of the information age: They're what guarantee the flawless transmission of digital information over the airwaves or through copper wire, even in the presence of the corrupting ...

The New York Times to cut 100 newsroom jobs

2 hours ago

The New York Times Co. says it is cutting about 100 newsroom jobs through buyouts and layoffs in an effort to trim costs and focus more on its digital efforts.

Minimally invasive surgery with hydraulic assistance

3 hours ago

Endoscopic surgery requires great manual dexterity on the part of the operating surgeon. Future endoscopic instruments equipped with a hydraulic control system will provide added support during minimally ...

Engineering new vehicle powertrains

4 hours ago

Car engines – whether driven by gasoline, diesel, or electricity – waste an abundance of energy. Researchers are working on ways to stem this wastefulness. Ultramodern test facilities are helping them ...

Analyzing gold and steel – rapidly and precisely

4 hours ago

Optical emission spectrometers are widely used in the steel industry but the instruments currently employed are relatively large and bulky. A novel sensor makes it possible to significantly reduce their size ...

User comments : 12

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Kedas
not rated yet Apr 06, 2010
14mm seems like a bit limited range.
Some chips have even the size of that range.
I would think practical would be around 10cm.
jmessina
not rated yet Apr 06, 2010
With a secondary antenna range increases to 50 mm. Still in development; range will increase so it will be a more practical solution.
jsovine
not rated yet Apr 06, 2010
Prime Intellect anyone?

http://www.kuro5h...tellect/
gunslingor1
1 / 5 (1) Apr 06, 2010
Looks like an interesting idea. I don't think it will be superior to wired IC connections for most applications, but it will be cheaper and will be superior for certain applications such as detachable circuitry which typically experiences contact wear. Hopefully they will not use it to replace all wired connections simply because it is a cheaper alternative, which may happen.
stealthc
1 / 5 (1) Apr 06, 2010
I would have to argue for this technology. I would buy their chips.
This can be used to reduce inter-connects on a circuit. This way low bandwidth applications and high bandwidth applications can result in unwired non-critical components and wired critical components to create much simpler circuitry and easier to program inter-connectivity. Less work with the oscilliscope. Less fiddling with ports and i2c/mi2c, ttl and serial interfaces.
stealthc
not rated yet Apr 06, 2010
At that scale, why not just run the antenna straight to the other components it is communicating with, as a single line interface? I'm sure that would do 50mm just fine, though I would make sure to get a good shielded line to run there with.

People here making comments don't sound like they've done anything with a micro-controller ever...lol. The benefit of fewer wires is noticeable if you are making a 7 layer motherboard.
NotAsleep
not rated yet Apr 06, 2010
Seems like a bad idea... wouldn't a solar flare/EMP blast fry these more easily than a standard chip?
DGBEACH
1 / 5 (1) Apr 06, 2010
Seems like a bad idea... wouldn't a solar flare/EMP blast fry these more easily than a standard chip?

I had the same thought. The entire thing would have to be inside of a lead-lined Faraday-cage to be immune from outside interference. But then again, only life-support systems would need to be THAT immune. This should be OK for things like large-screen TVs and such.
Dreep
1 / 5 (1) Apr 07, 2010
hey will anyone check if all these electromagnetic waves has any effect on the human brain.. because they can kill sparrows (proved)..
Graeme
not rated yet Apr 07, 2010
I could imagine each pushbutton or knob on the sony box has one of these chips behind it. It does not need to be wired in at all, as it is also powered by the press of the finger on the button, or torque on the knob. They would have to get the cost way down so that it was cheaper than the copper wiring involved otherwise.
Vaughn
not rated yet Apr 10, 2010
Place the chips in an orientation that makes sense for the constraint - simple arrangement like that of a rolodex comes to mind. This arrangement provides for close proximity of transmitters while allowing for high chip density. House the chip assembly in a faraday cage to protect the internal comms and external organics... Provide induction powe source to avoid 'other wires'. Use a aluminum fuel cell to power. Wi-fi to display and input devices... Bath the assembly in cooling bath and voila - Cray style super computer that you can put in your pocket!
jonnyboy
1 / 5 (1) Apr 11, 2010
Place the chips in an orientation that makes sense for the constraint - simple arrangement like that of a rolodex comes to mind. This arrangement provides for close proximity of transmitters while allowing for high chip density. House the chip assembly in a faraday cage to protect the internal comms and external organics... Provide induction powe source to avoid 'other wires'. Use a aluminum fuel cell to power. Wi-fi to display and input devices... Bath the assembly in cooling bath and voila - Cray style super computer that you can put in your pocket!


And what you end up with is the "magic box"