Motorola calls former CFO "treacherous officer"

Apr 10, 2009

(AP) -- A former executive who sued Motorola Inc. for firing him is a "treacherous officer," the telecommunications equipment maker said in court documents responding to his lawsuit.

Former Chief Financial Officer Paul Liska was fired for "serious misconduct and incompetence" and he planned a "scheme designed to portray himself as a whistleblower and demand millions in return for his silence," said in documents obtained by the Chicago Tribune and posted Thursday on its Web site.

Liska sued Schaumburg, Ill.-based Motorola in Cook County Circuit Court in Chicago on Feb. 20, a day after he was fired. He claims his dismissal was a "retaliatory discharge," which usually refers to an employee being fired for being a whistleblower.

Liska's attorney, Scott B. Crotty, did not immediately return a call seeking comment.

Motorola declined to release the court documents to The Associated Press on Thursday and declined to comment beyond the filings. Liska was terminated "for cause," according to a regulatory filing that Motorola issued on March 3.

Cook County officials would not release Motorola's court filings to the AP.

Liska claims he was praised consistently for his work and has said Motorola was trying to "destroy his reputation in retaliation for raising legitimate concerns" about Motorola's unit.

Liska did not receive his signing bonus, or severance pay.

In February, North America's largest maker of posted a massive fourth-quarter loss as it recorded charges to reflect the shrinking value of its cell phone business. It also suspended its dividend, said CFO Paul Liska had left and gave a disappointing forecast for the fiscal first quarter.

Faced with plunging cell phone revenue, the company had hatched a plan last year to spin off its Mobile Devices business, but persistent losses caused it to postpone that move.

When it reported fourth-quarter earnings back in February, Motorola gave no specific reason for Liska's departure, but co-CEO Greg Brown implied that it was connected to the delay of the phone spin-off. He said at the time that changes in the "business environment" made a change at the CFO post appropriate as well.

Motorola is now the No. 5 cell phone maker worldwide, with a 6.5 percent share.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Explore further: It's no bubble: Insane dotcom valuations reveal how integral tech is to our lives

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Icahn: Motorola Should Fix Problems Before Buyback

Apr 15, 2007

Billionaire investor Carl Icahn sent a letter to Motorola Inc. shareholders calling for the No.2 mobile phone maker to fix its operational problems, saying that took precedence to a share buyback.

Recommended for you

Alibaba makes Wall Street debut

19 minutes ago

Alibaba made its long-awaited Wall Street debut Friday on the heels of a record stock offering that opens the door to global expansion for the Chinese online retail giant.

Alibaba IPO to boost employee fortunes to $8 bn

3 hours ago

Employees of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba will see their fortunes swell to nearly $8 billion as the company prepares a massive US stock offering that could be valued at $25 billion.

Alibaba mega IPO caps founder Jack Ma success tale

6 hours ago

When Jack Ma founded Alibaba 15 years ago he insisted the e-commerce venture should see itself as competing against Silicon Valley, not other Chinese companies. That bold ambition from a time when China was ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

holoman
not rated yet Apr 10, 2009
He should of worked on Wall street, he would of been rewarded for greed and incompetence.