'Bending current' opens up the way for a new type of energy-efficient memory

March 4, 2016
A magnetic bit is being switched by bending electrons with the correct spin upwards through the bit. A special anti-ferromagnetic material on top of the bits makes the process reliable. Credit: Arno van den Brink / Eindhoven University of Technology

Use your computer without the need to start it up: a new type of magnetic memory makes it possible. This 'MRAM' is faster, more efficient and robust than other kinds of data storage. However, switching bits still requires too much electrical power to make large-scale application practicable. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) have discovered a smart way of solving this problem by using a 'bending current'. They publish their findings today in the journal Nature Communications.

MRAM (Magnetic Random Access Memory) stores data by making smart use of the 'spin' of , a kind of internal compass of the particles. Since magnetism is used instead of an electrical charge, the memory is permanent, even when there is a power failure, and so the computer no longer has to be started up. These magnetic memories also use much less power, which means that mobile phones, for example, can run longer on a battery.

Flipover

In a MRAM bits are projected by the direction of the spin of the electrons in a piece of magnetic material: for example, upwards for a '1' and downwards for a '0'. The storage of data occurs by flipping the spin of the electrons over to the correct side. Normal practice is to send an electrical current which contains electrons with the required spin direction through the bit. The large quantity of electrical current needed to do this hindered a definitive breakthrough for MRAM, which appeared on the market for the first time in 2006.

Bending current

In Nature Communications a group of TU/e physicists, led by professor Henk Swagten, today publishes a revolutionary method to flip the magnetic bits faster and more energy-efficiently. A current pulse is sent under the bit, which bends the electrons at the correct upwards, so through the bit. "It's a bit like a soccer ball that is kicked with a curve when the right effect is applied," says Arno van den Brink, TU/e PhD student and the first author of the article.

This image shows the experimental chip the researchers used for their measurements. Credit: Arno van den Brink / Eindhoven University of Technology

Frozen

The new memory is really fast but it needs something extra to make the flipping reliable. Earlier attempts to do this required a magnetic field but that made the method expensive and inefficient. The researchers have solved this problem by applying a special anti-ferromagnetic material on top of the bits. This enables the requisite magnetic field to be frozen, as it were, energy-efficient and low cost. "This could be the decisive nudge in the right direction for superfast MRAM in the near future," according to Van den Brink.

Explore further: Magnetic random-access memory based on new spin transfer technology achieves higher storage density

More information: A. van den Brink et al. Field-free magnetization reversal by spin-Hall effect and exchange bias, Nature Communications (2016). DOI: 10.1038/ncomms10854

Related Stories

Magnetic memories on the right track

August 27, 2014

Computer hard drives store data by writing magnetic information onto their surfaces. In the future, magnetic effects may also be used to improve active memory in computers, potentially eliminating the need to 'boot up' a ...

Spinning better electronic devices

March 2, 2016

A team of researchers, led by a group at the University of California, Riverside, have demonstrated for the first time the transmission of electrical signals through insulators in a sandwich-like structure, a development ...

Recommended for you

Measuring tiny forces with light

August 25, 2016

Photons are bizarre: They have no mass, but they do have momentum. And that allows researchers to do counterintuitive things with photons, such as using light to push matter around.

DNA chip offers big possibilities in cell studies

August 25, 2016

A UT Dallas physicist has developed a novel technology that not only sheds light on basic cell biology, but also could aid in the development of more effective cancer treatments or early diagnosis of disease.

Chemists explore outer regions of periodic table

August 25, 2016

A little known—and difficult to obtain—element on the fringes of the periodic table is broadening our fundamental understanding of chemistry. In the latest edition of the journal Science, Florida State University Professor ...

Understanding nature's patterns with plasmas

August 23, 2016

Patterns abound in nature, from zebra stripes and leopard spots to honeycombs and bands of clouds. Somehow, these patterns form and organize all by themselves. To better understand how, researchers have now created a new ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.