Iris scanners can now identify us from 40 feet away

May 22, 2015 by Anne-Marie Oostveen And Diana Dimitrova
Initiating iScan. Credit: Shutterstock

Biometric technologies are on the rise. By electronically recording data about individual's physical attributes such as fingerprints or iris patterns, security and law enforcement services can quickly identify people with a high degree of accuracy.

The latest development in this field is the scanning of irises from a distance of up to 40 feet (12 metres) away. Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University in the US demonstrated they were able to use their iris recognition technology to identify drivers from an image of their eye captured from their vehicle's side mirror.

The developers of this technology envisage that, as well as improving security, it will be more convenient for the individuals being identified. By using measurements of physiological characteristics, people no longer need security tokens or cumbersome passwords to identify themselves.

However, introducing such technology will come with serious challenges. There are both legal issues and public anxiety around having such sensitive data captured, stored, and accessed.

Social resistance

We have researched this area by presenting people with potential future scenarios that involved biometrics. We found that, despite the convenience of long-range identification (no queuing in front of scanners), there is a considerable reluctance to accept this technology.

On a basic level, people prefer a physical interaction when their biometrics are being read. "I feel negatively about a remote iris scan because I want there to be some kind of interaction between me and this system that's going to be monitoring me," said one participant in our research.

The video will load shortly

But another serious concern was that of "function creep", whereby people slowly become accustomed to security and surveillance technologies because they are introduced gradually. This means the public may eventually be faced with much greater use of these systems than they would initially agree to.

For example, implementing in smart phones and other everyday objects such as computers or cars could make people see the technology as useful and easy to operate, This may increase their willingness to adopt such systems. "I could imagine this becoming normalised to a point where you don't really worry about it," said one research participant.

Such familiarity could lead to the introduction of more invasive long-distance recognition systems. This could ultimately produce far more widespread commercial and governmental usage of biometric identification than the average citizen might be comfortable with. As one participant put it: "[A remote scan] could be done every time we walk into a big shopping centre, they could just identify people all over the place and you're not aware of it."

Legal barriers

The implementation of biometric systems is not just dependent on user acceptance or resistance. Before iris-scanning technology could be introduced in the EU, major and privacy considerations would have to be made.

The EU has a robust legal framework on privacy and data protection. These are recognised as fundamental rights and so related laws are among the highest ranking. Biometric data, such as iris scans, are often treated as special due to the sensitivity of the information they can contain. Our respondents also acknowledged this: "I think it's a little too invasive and to me it sounds a bit creepy. Who knows what they can find out by scanning my irises?"

Crowd control. Credit: Shutterstock

Before iris technology could be deployed, certain legal steps would need to be taken. Under EU law and the European Convention on Human Rights, authorities would need to demonstrate it was a necessary and proportionate solution to a legitimate, specific problem. They would also need to prove iris recognition was the least intrusive way to achieve that goal. And a proportionality test would have to take into account the risks the technology brings along with the benefits.

The very fact that long-range iris scanners can capture data without the collaboration of their subject also creates legal issues. EU law requires individuals to be informed when such information was being collected, by whom, for what purposes, and the existence of their rights surrounding the data.

Another issue is how the data is kept secure, particularly in the case of iris-scanning by objects such as . Scans stored on the device and/or on the cloud for purposes of future authentication would legally require robust security protection. Data stored on the cloud tends to move around between different servers and countries, which makes preventing unauthorised access more difficult.

The video will load shortly

The other issue with iris scanning is that, while the technology could be precise, it is not infallible. At its current level, the can still be fooled (see video above). And processing data accurately is another principle of EU data protection law.

Even if we do find ourselves subject to unwanted iris-scanning from 40 feet, safeguards for individuals should always be in place to ensure that they do not bear the burden of technological imperfections.

Explore further: Computer scientist sees new possibilities for ocular biometrics

Related Stories

Computer scientist sees new possibilities for ocular biometrics

November 4, 2014

While many of us rely on passwords to protect our identity, there's more sophisticated identity recognition technology called biometrics that we could use. Security measures that use biometrics rely on a person's unique characteristics ...

Fujitsu shows iris recognition system that unlocks phones

March 3, 2015

In the bid to come up with authentication solutions beyond passwords, fingerprint authentication from Qualcomm is making news, and so is Fujitsu's iris recognition, yet another potential authentication tech step forward. ...

Black Hat presentation shows iris-scanning breach

July 27, 2012

(Phys.org) -- A research team from Universidad Autonoma de Madrid and West Virginia University have troubling findings for those who think iris scanning is one of the safest methods of biometric security. Their reverse-engineered, ...

Knobbly knees in competition with fingerprints

January 23, 2013

Forget digital fingerprints, iris recognition and voice identification, the next big thing in biometrics could be your knobbly knees. Just as a fingerprints and other body parts are unique to us as individuals and so can ...

Shifty, but secure eyes

August 29, 2012

A biometric security system based on how a user moves their eyes is being developed by technologists in Finland. Writing in the International Journal of Biometrics, the team explains how a person's saccades, their tiny, but ...

Recommended for you

Android's Nougat update isn't flashy, but still pretty handy

September 28, 2016

Nougat, Google's latest update of its Android smartphone software, isn't particularly flashy; you might not even notice what's different about it at first. But it offers a number of practical time-saving features, plus a ...

Disabled man gets license, shows driverless tech's potential

September 28, 2016

Former Indy Racing League driver Sam Schmidt has done a lot in the 16 years since an accident left him paralyzed from the neck down. He runs a racing team and a foundation. He's raced a sailboat using his chin. But the man ...

Hyperloop pushes dream of low-cost futuristic transport

September 23, 2016

Is it a plane, is it a train? No, say supporters of Hyperloop, a futuristic mode of transport floated by Silicon Valley billionaire Elon Musk that promises high-tech, high-speed and cheap travel over long distances.

MIT's flea market specializes in rare, obscure electronics

September 25, 2016

Once a month in the summer, a small parking lot on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's campus transforms into a high-tech flea market known for its outlandish offerings. Tables overflow with antique radio equipment, ...

First test of driverless minibus in Paris Saturday

September 24, 2016

The French capital's transport authority will on Saturday carry out its first test of a driverless minibus, in the hope that regular routes for the hi-tech vehicles will be up and running within two years.

7 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

PhysicsMatter
4.5 / 5 (4) May 22, 2015
This is open invitation to identity theft. Identification based on "image" of iris or retina, fingerprint face, etc., should be outlawed. It has been repeatedly demonstrated, an effective simple hack of iPhone secured with fingerprint alone. As it was proven for fingerprints, blood splatters, and imprints etc.,matches have been wrong in at least half of forensic analyses showing clear expert bias toward other clues or "evidences" if present, makes it unreliable method as acknowledged by many forensic experts. The same with retina ID or face scan which could be cheaply defeated. I see no advantage for regular people with all those "cool" technologies" pushed by Silicon Valley VCs. However, they could enable bulk collections by security agencies for "future crime" use. But they're good guys and would not do it for sure! OOps, there goes Snowden.
El_Nose
5 / 5 (3) May 22, 2015
enter "minority report" like advertisements.
DeliriousNeuron
4 / 5 (2) May 22, 2015
This is easily spoofed. There are several things you can do to completely block iris scanners.
24volts
4.5 / 5 (4) May 22, 2015
Time to go back to wearing mirrored sunglasses outside all the time I guess.
DeliriousNeuron
3 / 5 (2) May 24, 2015
Don't forget about covering up the cameras smartphone manufacturers conveniently placed on our phones. Eyes are always watching you.
Remember...consume, obey and repeat. Its the American way.
ZenShadow
not rated yet May 24, 2015
Hey, Guido, hand me those Ice Picks.
antigoracle
not rated yet May 25, 2015
So, how far away can they read my fingerprint, when I show them the finger?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.