Hubble unveils a colorful view of the universe

Jun 03, 2014
Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have captured the most comprehensive picture ever assembled of the evolving universe -- and one of the most colorful. The study is called the Ultraviolet Coverage of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field project. Credit: NASA, ESA, H. Teplitz and M. Rafelski (IPAC/Caltech), A. Koekemoer (STScI), R. Windhorst (Arizona State University), and Z. Levay (STScI)

Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have captured the most comprehensive picture ever assembled of the evolving universe—and one of the most colorful. The study is called the Ultraviolet Coverage of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field project.

Prior to this survey, astronomers were in a curious position. They knew a lot about star formation occurring in nearby galaxies thanks to UV telescope facilities such as NASA's Galex observatory, which operated from 2003 to 2013. And, thanks to Hubble's near-infrared and visible capability, they had also studied star birth in the most distant galaxies. We see these distant galaxies in their most primitive stages due to the vast amount of time it takes their light to reach us.

However, between 5 and 10 billion light-years away from us—corresponding to a time period when most of the stars in the Universe were born—there was a lack of the data needed to fully understand star formation. The hottest, most massive and youngest stars, which emit light in the ultraviolet, were often neglected as subjects of direct observation, leaving a significant gap in our knowledge of the cosmic timeline.

The addition of ultraviolet data to the Hubble Ultra Deep Field using Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 gives astronomers access to direct observations of regions of unobscured and may help us to fully understand how stars formed. By observing at these wavelengths, researchers get a direct look at which galaxies are forming stars and, just as importantly, where the stars are forming. This enables astronomers to understand how galaxies like the Milky Way grew in size from small collections of very hot stars to the massive structures they are today.

The patch of sky in this image has been previously studied by in a series of visible and near-infrared exposures taken from 2004 to 2009: the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. Now, with the addition of ultraviolet light, they have combined the full range of colours available to Hubble, stretching all the way from ultraviolet to near- infrared light. The resulting image, made from 841 orbits of telescope viewing time, contains approximately 10 000 galaxies, extending back to within a few hundred million years of the Big Bang.

Since the Earth's atmosphere filters most , this work can only be accomplished with a space-based telescope like Hubble. Ultraviolet surveys like this are incredibly important in planning for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) as Hubble is the only telescope currently able to obtain the data that researchers will need to combine with infrared data from JWST.

The Hubble Ultra Deep Field 2014 image is a composite of separate exposures taken from 2003 to 2012 with Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3.

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GuruShabu
1 / 5 (4) Jun 03, 2014
There are two facts on this image that do against the cosmological principle and the BBT.
Firstly, there is no trace os ageing or asymmetry no matter how far or how close you observe the universe.
Secondly, the homogeneity essencial for the BBT canons be seen on any scale.
Burnerjack
5 / 5 (1) Jun 03, 2014
Considering that galaxies can be viewed within several 100M yrs of the Big Bang, can we locate where, as in what direction the BB was in relation to the Milky Way? Sorry if this is basic or has been addressed many times previous. I have not seen this data as of yet.
GuruShabu
1 / 5 (4) Jun 04, 2014
Considering that galaxies can be viewed within several 100M yrs of the Big Bang, can we locate where, as in what direction the BB was in relation to the Milky Way? Sorry if this is basic or has been addressed many times previous. I have not seen this data as of yet.

You are completely right mate!
IF the BBT is correct, space and time have began in a particular time (13.7 billion years ago) and a definitely X,Y and Z point in space (or the one that like to be more sophisticated like to say, in the space-time fabric).
Very good and basic big question mark for this theory that most of people take as a reality.
Ojorf
5 / 5 (6) Jun 04, 2014
Considering that galaxies can be viewed within several 100M yrs of the Big Bang, can we locate where, as in what direction the BB was in relation to the Milky Way?


The BB happened everywhere at the same time, it wasn't an explosions somewhere that expanded into some empty space. It was space itself expanding.
IMP-9
5 / 5 (6) Jun 04, 2014
there is no trace os ageing or asymmetry no matter how far or how close you observe the universe

Wrong. You claim there is no asymmetry and then you say there is no homogeneity. I don't understand, in any case homogeneity is only seen in much larger samples than this. Galaxy evolution is seen statistically in the Hubble deep fields. one effect is the rise and fall of star formation, another the Gunn-Peterson troughs. Looking at a picture and claiming these things tells you nothing. Most of what you see is the very near galaxies, the distant ones are tiny and faint. Looking and guessing is not science.

a definitely X,Y and Z point in space

No. The expansion of space is metric. It stretches. The big bang was not an explosion in space but an expansion of space. Run the stretching backwards and all points lie on top of one another but it doesn't happen in one place, all places are coincident.
vidyunmaya
1 / 5 (2) Jun 22, 2014
Sub:Astronomers need to catch-up with Cosmological index
Your Information:Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have captured the most comprehensive picture ever assembled of the evolving universe -- and one of the most colorful. The study is called the Ultraviolet Coverage of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field project
Comments: Necessity- Demand- curiosity and Sustain the Spirit of Cosmology studies through origins-Vedas Interlinks
Where is the Compehension ?
TechnoCreed
5 / 5 (4) Jun 22, 2014
Sub:Astronomers need to catch-up with Cosmological index
Your Information:Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have captured the most comprehensive picture ever assembled of the evolving universe -- and one of the most colorful. The study is called the Ultraviolet Coverage of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field project
Comments: Necessity- Demand- curiosity and Sustain the Spirit of Cosmology studies through origins-Vedas Interlinks
Where is the Compehension ?
Phys.org is a science website intended for an international public. Origin Vedas are from Hindu spirituality so are culture specific; not viewed as science from an international perspective.
hgldr
5 / 5 (1) Jun 23, 2014
Burnerjack & GuruShabu, No. There was no X, Y, Z point in space relative to our galaxy where the BB occurred. There was no space.