Hunt for extraterrestrial life gets massive methane boost

Jun 16, 2014
Credit: ESA (European Space Agency)

A powerful new model to detect life on planets outside of our solar system, more accurately than ever before, has been developed by UCL (University College London) researchers.

The focuses on , the simplest organic molecule, widely acknowledged to be a sign of potential life.

Researchers from UCL and the University of New South Wales have developed a new spectrum for 'hot' methane which can be used to detect the molecule at temperatures above that of Earth, up to 1,500K/1220°C – something which was not possible before.

To find out what remote planets orbiting other stars are made of, astronomers analyse the way in which their atmospheres absorb starlight of different colours and compare it to a model, or 'spectrum', to identify different molecules.

Professor Jonathan Tennyson, (UCL Department of Physics and Astronomy) co-author of the study said: "Current models of methane are incomplete, leading to a severe underestimation of methane levels on planets. We anticipate our new model will have a big impact on the future study of and 'cool' stars external to our , potentially helping scientists identify signs of extraterrestrial life."

The study, published today in PNAS, describes how the researchers used some of the UK's most advanced supercomputers, provided by the Distributed Research utilising Advanced Computing (DiRAC) project and run by the University of Cambridge, to calculate nearly 10 billion spectroscopic lines, each with a distinct colour at which methane can absorb light. The new list of lines is 2000 times bigger than any previous study, which means it can give more accurate information across a broader range of temperatures than was previously possible.

Lead author of the study, Dr Sergei Yurchenko, (UCL Department of Physics and Astronomy) added: "The comprehensive spectrum we have created has only been possible with the astonishing power of modern supercomputers which are needed for the billions of lines required for the modelling. We limited the temperature threshold to 1,500K to fit the capacity available, so more research could be done to expand the model to higher temperatures still. Our calculations required about 3 million CPU () hours alone; processing power only accessible to us through the DiRAC project.

"We are thrilled to have used this technology to significantly advance beyond previous models available for researchers studying potential life on astronomical objects, and we are eager to see what our new spectrum helps them discover." he added.

The new model has been tested and verified by successfully reproducing in detail the way in which the methane in failed stars, called brown dwarfs, absorbs light.

Explore further: Energy Department seeks methane hydrate proposals

More information: Spectrum of hot methane in astronomical objects using a comprehensive computed line list, PNAS, www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1324219111

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bach_tran
1 / 5 (1) Jun 16, 2014
They have to be kidding me. Methane is extremely abundant in our universe and indeed is a primordial constituent of many different planetesimal and planetary bodies (take Titan for instance).

How does this make it any more likely to spell out that there is life on these other bodies when methane can be observed to be practically everywhere in the universe? In fact, we don't know for certain whether our own natural gas/methane is truly of biological origin, hence the abiogenic theory of methane formation.
Benni
5 / 5 (2) Jun 16, 2014
@bachtran

"a new spectrum for 'hot' methane which can be used to detect the molecule at temperatures above that of Earth, up to 1,500K/1220°C – something which was not possible before."

It's the temperature threshold that makes the difference........the outer orbital planets of our solar system never reach these thresholds, except possbly for Jupiter, which seems to have a heat source of its own. So what they must be looking for are planets proportionately distant as Earth or Venus is to their host star.