Iceland ups 2014 whaling quotas

Dec 13, 2013
The tails of two 35-tonne Fin whales are bound to a Hvalur boat on June 19, 2009 after being caught off the coast of Hvalfjsrour, north of Reykjavik, on the western coast of Iceland

Iceland announced Friday it has increased its 2014 quotas for whaling in a move likely to intensify international condemnation of the practice.

The country's fishing ministry said the hunting and killing of would be increased by six percent, from 216 in 2013 to 229 in 2014. The hunting quota for rorquals—which includes , and fin whales—remains unchanged at 154.

In 2013, Iceland's whalers did not reach the quotas permitted by their government, killing only 134 rorquals and 38 minke whales.

Since it resumed whaling in 2006 despite an international moratorium, Iceland, along with Norway, has come in for furious criticism from environmental groups and some other countries.

Icelanders eat little whale meat, and most of the catch is sent to the Japanese market.

Japan also hunts whales, but qualifies the activity as scientific research, even though whale meat finds its way to its restaurants.

Australia and New Zealand have taken Japan to the International Court of Justice in The Hague over its activity. The court in July said it was deliberating on the issue and would give its verdict at some future date.

Explore further: Norwegian whale hunters satisfied with increased catch

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Iceland resumes controversial fin whale hunt

Jun 17, 2013

Iceland has resumed its disputed commercial fin whale hunt, with two vessels en route to catch this season's quota of at least 154 whales, Icelandic media reported on Monday.

Iceland to resume disputed fin whale hunt in June

May 05, 2013

Iceland plans to resume its disputed commercial fin whale hunt in June with a quota of at least 154 whales, the head of the only company that catches the giant mammals said Saturday.

Whale meat ship returns to Iceland

Jul 22, 2013

A shipment of 130 tonnes of fin whale meat has been sent back to Iceland, as jubilant animal rights activists on Sunday highlighted the "pointlessness" of the trade.

Recommended for you

Bangladesh meet begins to save endangered tigers

12 hours ago

Some 140 tiger experts and government officials from 20 countries met in the Bangladeshi capital Dhaka on Sunday to review progress towards an ambitious goal of doubling their number in the wild by 2022.

Plant life considered in ecosystem synergies

Sep 12, 2014

Local flora species involved in UWA's Ridgefield Multiple Ecosystem Services Experiment are helping researchers to better understand agricultural processes including efficient nutrient cycles and maintaining ...

Potato ravaging pest controlled with fungi

Sep 12, 2014

Approximately six thousand hectares of Veracruz, in the west coast of Mexico, are dedicated to the production of potato (Solanum tuberosum). During the past 30 years, the fields of the Cofre de Perote area ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

alfie_null
not rated yet Dec 14, 2013
I have read elsewhere that Japan has trouble consuming the whales they themselves catch, let alone what is imported (from Iceland, Norway). The generations that enjoyed it are dying off, and younger generations have other preferences, other tastes.