Whale meat ship returns to Iceland

July 22, 2013
A photo released on February 7, 2008 shows whales dragged on a Japanese ship after being harpooned in Antarctic waters. A shipment of 130 tonnes of fin whale meat has been sent back to Iceland, as jubilant animal rights activists highlight the "pointlessness" of the trade.

A shipment of 130 tonnes of fin whale meat has been sent back to Iceland, as jubilant animal rights activists on Sunday highlighted the "pointlessness" of the trade.

Television pictures showed the boat returning to its original port of Reykjavik laden with the meat, followed by a boat chartered by the International Fund for Animal Welfare.

The boat carrying the meat from 10 whales originally left the Icelandic capital in June before docking in Rotterdam, then Hamburg.

But before its scheduled departure for Japan, the Dutch maritime transporter Samskip announced on July 11 that it had agreed with other carriers not to export the meat and instead send it back to Iceland.

The company also promised not to carry in future.

Sigursteinn Masson, spokesman for the IFAW in Iceland, said: "No one wants this meat.

"We wanted to make people aware of how pointless the is, especially the finback hunt."

Iceland only resumed the hunting of this year, the second largest animal on Earth after the blue whale, after suspending whaling in 2011 and 2012, partly because its largest market, Japan, was suffering from an economic downturn.

The International Whaling Commission has banned , but this is not recognised by Iceland.

Japan says it hunts only for scientific purposes.

Explore further: Iceland resumes controversial fin whale hunt

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alfie_null
not rated yet Jul 22, 2013
Who's paying for this meat? I've read there's decreasing demand - not something younger generations eat - and Japanese whalers have some trouble disposing of what they catch themselves.

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