New capacitors to improve electric vehicles

Aug 02, 2013

Scientists from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) have developed a new lead-free, high temperature ceramic capacitor that could improve the efficiency and reliability of electric and hybrid vehicles.

Hybrid and electric vehicles rely on and management, with automotive power electronics representing an emerging £40 billion global market.

The power electronics found in vehicles today require cooling because of limitations in the temperature rating of components such as capacitors, which are used to store electrical energy. This is a disadvantage as the extra cooling systems add weight to the vehicles, reducing efficiency and reliability.

The Technology Strategy Board programme for Low Carbon Vehicles funded scientists at NPL and their collaborators to work on a solution to this problem by developing a new ceramic capacitor dielectric material with a high , called HITECA, which operates with a stable capacitance at temperatures of 200 °C and above.

The use of this material in electric and hybrid vehicles would reduce the need for cooling and the associated weight of the vehicles. Its high permittivity could enable smaller electronic devices and its reduced loss of capacitance with voltage could improve overall vehicle performance. Other types of capacitor, for example capacitors, can lose up to 85% of their capacitance at working voltage.

As well as having applications in the , HITECA capacitors could improve high temperature electronics in the aerospace, power, oil and gas sectors, and in high energy applications such as 'pulsed power' - where energy is stored over a period of time before being released as a high power 'pulse'.

Tatiana Correia, who led the work at NPL, said: "Industrial electronics need to be able to perform in the in which they operate. The ability of HITECA capacitors to function at higher temperatures than existing capacitors will help make electronic systems more robust and remove barriers for technologies such as electric vehicles that rely on them."

Explore further: New oscillator for low-power implantable transcievers

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Thin, flexible glass for energy storage

Jul 22, 2013

A new use for glass is being developed by researchers in Penn State's Materials Research Institute that could make future hybrid-electric and plug-in electric vehicles more affordable and reliable.

High-performance energy storage

Jul 03, 2007

North Carolina State University physicists have recently deduced a way to improve high-energy-density capacitors so that they can store up to seven times as much energy per unit volume than the common capacitor.

New material holds big energy hope

Jul 01, 2013

(Phys.org) —A new material that can store large amounts of energy with very little energy loss has been developed by researchers at the Australian National University.

Recommended for you

Microsoft beefs up security protection in Windows 10

7 hours ago

What Microsoft users in business care deeply about—-a system architecture that supports efforts to get their work done efficiently; a work-centric menu to quickly access projects rather than weather readings ...

US official: Auto safety agency under review

20 hours ago

Transportation officials are reviewing the "safety culture" of the U.S. agency that oversees auto recalls, a senior Obama administration official said Friday. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has been criticized ...

Out-of-patience investors sell off Amazon

20 hours ago

Amazon has long acted like an ideal customer on its own website: a freewheeling big spender with no worries about balancing a checkbook. Investors confident in founder and CEO Jeff Bezos' invest-and-expand ...

Ebola.com domain sold for big payout

20 hours ago

The owners of the website Ebola.com have scored a big payday with the outbreak of the epidemic, selling the domain for more than $200,000 in cash and stock.

Hacker gets prison for cyberattack stealing $9.4M

Oct 24, 2014

An Estonian man who pleaded guilty to orchestrating a 2008 cyberattack on a credit card processing company that enabled hackers to steal $9.4 million has been sentenced to 11 years in prison by a federal judge in Atlanta.

Magic Leap moves beyond older lines of VR

Oct 24, 2014

Two messages from Magic Leap: Most of us know that a world with dragons and unicorns, elves and fairies is just a better world. The other message: Technology can be mindboggingly awesome. When the two ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

GSwift7
1 / 5 (1) Aug 05, 2013
HITECA capacitors could improve high temperature electronics in the aerospace, power, oil and gas sectors, and in high energy applications such as 'pulsed power' - where energy is stored over a period of time before being released as a high power 'pulse'


And those annoying thump thump car stereos. They'll love these, since the capacitors they use now are huge and they get really hot. So, now they can play their music even louder. Great.

A small version of this would be really nice in my remote control helicopters though.
rug
1 / 5 (2) Aug 05, 2013
A small version of this would be really nice in my remote control helicopters though.


My first thought was remote control cars. Anything where you want fast charging electrical storage with a fast discharge. If the charge is high enough you could almost replace batteries with capacitors. They charge a lot faster, can discharge a lot faster, and generally last for more recharges then lithium ion batteries.

I'm kinda thinking cell phones. How nice would it be to have a phone charge in less then a second? Even if you have to charge it twice a day it would be worth it.