Researchers suggest gas cloud could reveal black holes near center of Milky Way galaxy

Jun 03, 2013 by Bob Yirka report
Color composite image of Centaurus A, revealing the lobes and jets emanating from the active galaxy’s central black hole. Composite images: ESO/WFI (Optical); MPIfR/ESO/APEX/A.Weiss et al. (Submillimetre); NASA/CXC/CfA/R.Kraft et al. (X-ray)

(Phys.org) —A team of researchers from Columbia University has published a paper in Physical Review Letters in which they suggest that the movement of gas cloud G2 near the center of our galaxy may reveal previously hidden small black holes. They note also that observation of G2's movement might lead to direct evidence of the existence of intermediate size black holes.

G2, a massive cloud of gasses three times the size of Pluto's (but just 3 times the mass of Earth) was discovered moving through our galaxy two years ago by researchers at the Institute. After noting its projected path, the researchers at Columbia have found that it will likely pass through a region of space that is thought to harbor as many as 20,000 small (a single is believed to exist at the center of our galaxy.) They suggest that researchers here on Earth might be able to actually see the interaction between the and any black holes that are encountered. As the gas cloud comes near a black hole, they believe some of the gas will begin to spiral as it's pulled in by its gravity. That, they say, should cause a lot of heat to be expelled and x-ray light to be emitted—enough to be observable using x-ray telescopes. They go so far as to estimate that researchers might be able to see evidence of as many as 16 interactions.

More exciting to some in the field, is the possibility that the movement of G2 through our galaxy may give direct evidence of what are known as intermediate sized black holes—believed by some to be several times the mass of our sun. To date, their existence is purely theoretical. If G2 comes across one, and interacts with it, the event could prove that they really do exist. They, like the many small black holes in the universe, are believed to reside near the center of the galaxy, which is where G2 is heading. The researchers estimate it will reach the best position for study this September, giving researchers plenty of time to prepare.

One unknown attribute of G2 could throw a wrench into the project however—the density of the gas cloud is not yet known. If it's not dense enough, any interactions with a black hole may not create enough light to be seen from Earth.

Explore further: Researchers demonstrate ultra low-field nuclear magnetic resonance using Earth's magnetic field

More information: Gas Cloud G2 Can Illuminate the Black Hole Population Near the Galactic Center, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 221102 (2013) prl.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v110/i22/e221102

Abstract
Galactic nuclei are expected to be densely populated with stellar- and intermediate-mass black holes. Exploring this population will have important consequences for the observation prospects of gravitational waves as well as understanding galactic evolution. The gas cloud G2 currently approaching Sgr A* provides an unprecedented opportunity to probe the black hole and neutron star population of the Galactic nucleus. We examine the possibility of a G2-cloud–black-hole encounter and its detectability with current x-ray satellites, such as Chandra and NuSTAR. We find that multiple encounters are likely to occur close to the pericenter, which may be detectable upon favorable circumstances. This opportunity provides an additional important science case for leading x-ray observatories to closely follow G2 on its way to the nucleus.

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User comments : 12

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cantdrive85
1.3 / 5 (16) Jun 03, 2013
More exciting to some in the field, is the possibility that the movement of G2 through our galaxy may give direct evidence of what are known as intermediate sized black holes—believed by some to be several times the mass of our sun. To date, their (BH) existence is purely theoretical.


Such is the case with ALL black holes, they are ALL purely theoretical.
yyz
5 / 5 (5) Jun 03, 2013
"More exciting to some in the field, is the possibility that the movement of G2 through our galaxy may give direct evidence of what are known as intermediate sized black holes....To date, their existence is purely theoretical."

Not true. Evidence for an IMBH in ESO 243-49 was reported here at PhysOrg by Bob Yirka himself just a year ago: http://phys.org/n...ole.html

There is also good evidence for IMBHs in several other galaxies. That minor quibble aside, this is a good story on a recent paper concerning the possible fate of G2 during its encounter with Sgr A* later this year. A (free) preprint of the PRL paper is available here: http://arxiv.org/abs/1302.3220
Shootist
4.4 / 5 (14) Jun 03, 2013
More exciting to some in the field, is the possibility that the movement of G2 through our galaxy may give direct evidence of what are known as intermediate sized black holes—believed by some to be several times the mass of our sun. To date, their (BH) existence is purely theoretical.


Such is the case with ALL black holes, they are ALL purely theoretical.


No. Cygnus X-1 is proven black hole. As are numerous Galactic BHs. Some have even been imaged to the point where the difference between neutron stars and black holes can be demonstrated.

You are a loon of the second order. And a troll.
cantdrive85
1 / 5 (15) Jun 03, 2013
All BH's are theoretical, each and every different type whether it be small, medium, intermediate, super massive, or even the super stupendously monstrous fantastical BHs. Each and every one is a hypothetical mathematical construct void of direct observation. Each and every data point used by relativists to support their BH POV is readily explained by plasma effects.
cantdrive85
1 / 5 (14) Jun 03, 2013
Cygnus X-1 is proven black hole. As are numerous Galactic BHs. Some have even been imaged to the point where the difference between neutron stars and black holes can be demonstrated.

Only as seen through the blurry eyes of a relativist.

vidyunmaya
1 / 5 (12) Jun 03, 2013
Sub: Multiple Encounters-Galactic region-Vedas-Knowledge Base
Best of brains trust needed for Origins-Cosmology Vedas interlinks. The Milkyway forms the Knowledge Base.
The concept of Black-hole is wrong.
Plasma Refulated Electromagnetic phenomena in magnetic field environment- process this region. In particular I prepared few more realizable projections around Milky Way Galactic frame in my latst addition- Knowledge base Creation-Jnanam Udbhavam-Dattam [75 PPT] -sent for copyrights-May 2013.
Welcome East-west Interaction. vidyardhicosmology [dot] blogspot [dot] com
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (13) Jun 03, 2013
Galactic nuclei are expected to be densely populated with stellar- and intermediate-mass black holes
Due the density of interstellar gas and dust here we should observe more activity typical for black holes there. Which we don't observe. In AWT the stellar black holes don't exist at all - they're all formed with dense quark and neutron stars.
Neinsense99
3.5 / 5 (11) Jun 04, 2013
Sub: Multiple Encounters-Galactic region-Vedas-Knowledge Base
Best of brains trust needed for Origins-Cosmology Vedas interlinks. The Milkyway forms the Knowledge Base.
The concept of Black-hole is wrong.
Plasma Refulated Electromagnetic phenomena in magnetic field environment- process this region. In particular I prepared few more realizable projections around Milky Way Galactic frame in my latst addition- Knowledge base Creation-Jnanam Udbhavam-Dattam [75 PPT] -sent for copyrights-May 2013.
Welcome East-west Interaction. vidyardhicosmology [dot] blogspot [dot] com

Forget the Electric Universe, it's a SPAM Universe.
Fleetfoot
5 / 5 (3) Jun 05, 2013
Each and every data point used by relativists to support their BH POV is readily explained by plasma effects.


You haven't a hope of explain the Keplerian orbits of the core stars without a mass of ~4 million times the Sun for Sag A* and there are also strict observational limits on the maximum radius of that object.
cantdrive85
1 / 5 (6) Jun 05, 2013
Really? Nope!

According to Plasma Cosmology Theory;

"Stars are an electrical phenomenon. Stars are not formed by gravitational accretion but in the incomparably more powerful plasma z-pinch. The galactic plasmoid is a concentrated z-pinch. As a z-pinch subsides, experiment shows that a number of consolidated objects that formed along the pinch scatter like buckshot. So stars born in the plasmoid will initially have random eccentric orbits. Stellar rotation is imparted by the pinch vortex and should be similar in the group. The stars beyond 0.02 parsec from the Galactic Center show different kinematics and stellar properties from those stars inside that limit. It indicates a discontinuity in the properties of the plasma environment rather than something intrinsic to the stars."

So the orbits of these stars is PREDICTED by PC, based upon laboratory experimentation of plasmoids. The very same type of plasmoids that are created at z pinches along Birkeland currents.
yyz
not rated yet Jun 05, 2013
"So the orbits of these stars is PREDICTED by PC, based upon laboratory experimentation of plasmoids. The very same type of plasmoids that are created at z pinches along Birkeland currents."

Do you have a link to a published paper in a relevant peer-reviewed journal that contains that prediction specifically wrt Sgr A*?