Local police grapple with response to cybercrimes

Apr 13, 2013 by Eileen Sullivan
In this Dec. 13, 2011, file photo, a California Department of Justice employee holds up counterfeit jewelry that was confiscated during an investigation before it was sold on eBay during a news conference in San Jose, Calif. If a purse with $900 is stolen, the victim probably would call the police. If a computer hacker steals $900 from that same person's bank account, what then? Call the police? Could they even help? As it is now, local police don't have widespread know-how to investigate cybercrimes. They rely heavily on the expertise of the federal government, which focuses on large, often international cybercrimes. What's missing is the first response role, typically the preserve of local police departments that respond to calls for help from individuals and communities. They're looking to boost their expertise to be able to respond to high-tech crimes that are expected to only get worse. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)

(AP)—If a purse with $900 is stolen, the victim probably would call the police.

If a steals $900 from that person's bank account, what then? Call the police? Could they even help?

Police now don't have widespread know-how to investigate cybercrimes, and they rely heavily on the expertise of the , which focuses on large, often international cybercrimes.

In this Jan. 11, 2013, file photo, equipment to analyze mobile and smart phones is displayed in a lab during a media tour of the Cybercrime Center at Europol headquarters in The Hague, Netherlands. If a purse with $900 is stolen, the victim probably would call the police. If a computer hacker steals $900 from that same person's bank account, what then? Call the police? Could they even help? As it is now, local police don't have widespread know-how to investigate cybercrimes. They rely heavily on the expertise of the federal government, which focuses on large, often international cybercrimes. What's missing is the first response role, typically the preserve of local police departments that respond to calls for help from individuals and communities. They're looking to boost their expertise to be able to respond to high-tech crimes that are expected to only get worse. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)

What's missing is the first response role, typically owned by local police.

around the country are now looking to boost their expertise to respond to these cybercrimes and cyberthreats.

Officials have said cyberthreats will soon become as big as or eclipse the threat of terrorism.

In this Nov. 8, 2006, file photo, confiscated computers and child-oriented pornographic tapes fill the storeroom shelves in the Florida Attorney General's Child Predator CyberCrime Unit office in Jacksonville, Fla. If a purse with $900 is stolen, the victim probably would call the police. If a computer hacker steals $900 from that same person's bank account, what then? Call the police? Could they even help? As it is now, local police don't have widespread know-how to investigate cybercrimes. They rely heavily on the expertise of the federal government, which focuses on large, often international cybercrimes. What's missing is the first response role, typically the preserve of local police departments that respond to calls for help from individuals and communities. They're looking to boost their expertise to be able to respond to high-tech crimes that are expected to only get worse. (AP Photo/Oscar Sosa)


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User comments : 5

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cyberCMDR
not rated yet Apr 13, 2013
The bulk of the captions for each photo is identical. This was written by the Department of Redundancy Department?
Vviper
not rated yet Apr 13, 2013
Where IS the article? This looks like someone submitted a pig with some bread and called it a ham sandwich
pokerdice1
not rated yet Apr 13, 2013
Scale back this stupid drug war and refocus resources into dealing with cybercrimes.
alfie_null
not rated yet Apr 14, 2013
I think victims understand how useless reporting a cybercrime is. How unlikely a resolution is.
How to fix? I'd guess funding. And some way to ensure the funds are spent efficiently. Probably better apps and more training for local law enforcement. Coordination of data and communication between regions and agencies. Cybercrime isn't regional. Make it easy (fast, efficient) for police to get the answers to their cybercrime queries. Otherwise cybercrime cases migrate to the back of the queue as police have to focus on what is likely to produce the most results for their work.

The gamut of data police might want to access in investigating a crime is large and bumps up against privacy rights. Given the technologically illiterate politicians we elect nowadays, this is not an easy to resolve problem.
kochevnik
not rated yet Apr 14, 2013
US police seem more adept at cracking skulls for their bankster overlords or enforcing racial quotas than solving cybercrimes. After all, what's in it for them? Easier to train the police dog to bark on signal and seize people's property without cause

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