'Smartware' clothing could signal impending epileptic seizures

Sep 28, 2012
'Intelligent' clothing could signal impending epileptic seizures
Credit: Shutterstock

Researchers and engineers at Northumbria University in the United Kingdom have developed intelligent self-repairing clothing and sensors that can emit warnings that an epileptic seizure is going to start.

This latest creation, along with a number of other innovative tools and solutions, was showcased at the recent launch of Northumbria's new P3i research group at the Royal Academy of Engineering (RAE) in the United Kingdom in September. A design research initiative, P3i seeks to speed up the development of 'printable, paintable and programmable' intelligent (P3i) materials that could then help make intelligent products, services and experiences a reality.

P3i's designers, engineers and mathematicians are providing key technical solutions that make living much better for society. The centre is going to start evaluating materials and technologies in, on and around the human body. P3i researchers gave the world a glimpse of what they do at the Towards Future Ways of Living exhibition at the RAE.

The Northumbria specialists are driving new technology development in Europe. So far, they have developed a bioplotter machine that can print multi-component three-dimensional structures, as well as an that analyses materials at the nanoscale.

They are currently working on 'smartware', fabrics that treat that result from diabetes and . Their 'senseware' technology, which is found inside textiles, can give medical professionals the tools they need to detect the onset of . The centre's 'bioware' technology is embedded materials and surfaces found in the home and on the body.

'The work of P3i designers and engineers will place individuals at the centre of technology, devising solutions for an , developing technologies that enhance life quality and creating customised products that connect with people on an emotional level,' said P3i chair Professor Raymond Oliver. 'Our aim is to be at the forefront of design-led, need-driven, technology-anchored and solutions-focused innovative products and services with a real purpose.'

Explore further: Researchers use passive UHF RFID tags to detect how people interact with objects

More information: P3i: www.northumbria.ac.uk/sd/academic/scd/research/themes/makingsense/p3i/

Related Stories

P3i – the future of innovative design

Sep 04, 2012

Intelligent self-repairing clothing and sensors that can detect the potential onset of an epileptic seizure sound like the stuff of science fiction but Northumbria University designers and engineers are turning ...

New software to improve design tools

Jan 13, 2009

A team of Carnegie Mellon University engineers led by Levent Burak Kara and Kenji Shimada have developed software that will let engineers design new products by simply sketching their ideas on a tablet computer.

Norway: Nano for the Future

Aug 04, 2004

A major foresight project on materials technology has been launched to put Norway's need for expertise in nano- and materials technology on the agenda.

Ford develops heart rate monitoring seat

May 24, 2011

Ford engineers have developed a car seat that can monitor a driver’s heartbeat, opening the door to a wealth of health, convenience and even life-saving potential.

Recommended for you

Intellectual property in 3D printing

Apr 16, 2015

The implications of intellectual property in 3D printing have been outlined in two documents created for the UK government by Bournemouth University's Dinusha Mendis and Davide Secchi, and Phil Reeves of Econolyst Ltd.

World-record electric motor for aircraft

Apr 16, 2015

Siemens researchers have developed a new type of electric motor that, with a weight of just 50 kilograms, delivers a continuous output of about 260 kilowatts – five times more than comparable drive systems. ...

Space open for business, says Electron launch system CEO

Apr 15, 2015

Space, like business, is all about time and money, said Peter Beck, CEO of Rocket Lab, a US company with a New Zealand subsidiary. The problem, he added, is that, in cost and time, space has remained an incredibly ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.