Related topics: epilepsy · brain · brain activity · brain cells · neurons

Functioning brain follows famous sand pile model

One of the deep problems in understanding the brain is to understand how relatively simple computing units (the neurons), collectively perform extremely complex operations (thinking).

Cats and humans suffer from similar forms of epilepsy

Epilepsy arises when the brain is temporarily swamped by uncoordinated signals from nerve cells.  Research at the Vetmeduni Vienna has now uncovered a cause of a particular type of epilepsy in cats.  Surprisingly, an incorrectly ...

P3i – the future of innovative design

Intelligent self-repairing clothing and sensors that can detect the potential onset of an epileptic seizure sound like the stuff of science fiction but Northumbria University designers and engineers are turning them into ...

Electronic tattoo monitors brain, heart and muscles (w/ video)

Imagine if there were electronics able to prevent epileptic seizures before they happen. Or electronics that could be placed on the surface of a beating heart to monitor its functions. The problem is that such devices are ...

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Seizure

An epileptic seizure is a transient symptom of excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain. It can manifest as an alteration in mental state, tonic or clonic movements, convulsions, and various other psychic symptoms (such as déjà vu or jamais vu). The medical syndrome of recurrent, unprovoked seizures is termed epilepsy, but seizures can occur in people who do not have epilepsy.

About 4% of people will have an unprovoked seizure by the age of 80 and only 30% to 40% or according to another study 50% chance of a second one. Treatment may reduce the chance of a second one by as much as half.

The treatment of epilepsy is a subspecialty of neurology; the study of seizures is part of neuroscience. Doctors who specialize in epilepsy are epileptologists; doctors who specialize in the treatment of children with epilepsy are pediatric epileptologists.

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