Study: Food crisis imminent within next decade if no change to climate policy

Sep 12, 2012

Research released today shows that within the next 10 years large parts of Asia can expect increased risk of more severe droughts, which will impact regional and possibly even global food security.

The report, led by the University of Leeds and published by the UK-based Centre for Low Carbon Futures, highlights China, Pakistan and Turkey as the most seriously affected major producers of wheat and and urges policymakers to focus attention on climate change adaptation to avert an imminent .

On average, across Asia, droughts lasting longer than three months will be more than twice as severe in terms of their deficit compared to the 1990-2005 period. This is cause for concern as China and India have the world's largest populations and are Asia's largest .

The research was led by Professor Piers Forster from the School of Earth and Environment at the University of Leeds, who is also a lead author on (IPCC) reports that have directly informed UN of the latest science.  The study was based on climate change projections from 12 leading climate modelling centres around the world and finds clear signals of climate change emerging within the next 10 years.

Commenting on the results of the analysis Dr Lawrence Jackson, a co-author of the report, said: "Our work surprised us when we saw that the threat to food security was so imminent; the increased risk of severe droughts is only 10 years away for China and India. These are the world's largest populations and food producers; and, as such, this poses a real threat to food security."

Prof Forster said: "The message for policymakers is clear. The threat to food production in Asia from risk brought on by climate change could be felt in the next 10-15 years. Given the slow rate of progress achieved over the 20 years up to the recent United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio +20), we cannot wait for actions to address the changes in the physical climate if we want to feed the growing Asian population and limit impact on global food security. Immediate actions are needed to achieve more sustainable use of water supplies and enhance adaptive capacity."

Jon Price, Director of the Centre for Low Carbon Futures, said: "We commissioned this new study because until now most projections on food security and drought have been to the 2050s - far out of range for most policy makers to contemplate. Our report projects impacts for the 2020s. It shows in this period we will see marked increase in drought severity across much of Asia."

He added: "This new work takes a very different approach to traditional 50 year timescale global scale modelling by highlighting decisions and actions that need to be addressed immediately if we are to avoid the perfect storm on the horizon. What's new is that we are presenting evidence that drought will impact food production in the near term meaning policy makers no longer have to wait to make crucial  decisions."

The report Food Security: Near future projections of the impact of drought in Asia is available online at www.lowcarbonfutures.org .

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Meyer
2.4 / 5 (17) Sep 12, 2012
If they spew enough of this junk for enough regions of the globe, they are sure to get one prediction right eventually.
deatopmg
2.1 / 5 (18) Sep 12, 2012
@Meyer this harks back to doomsters Anne and Paul Ehrlich in the 60's - beware; massive famines in the 70's, oops - uh, we meant the '80's - um, ah....ah...

Doomsters are nutcases. They are 99.99% wrong but never seem to lose their public adulation nor tax based funding, unlike the boy who cried "wolf" one too many times.
ryggesogn2
2.8 / 5 (14) Sep 12, 2012
How about enacting market reforms that allow food producers to have the tools to raise and sell food without central planning?
Zimbabwe,Cuba, DPRK have food shortages because of their socialist govts, not climate.
nnoxks
4.1 / 5 (13) Sep 12, 2012
@deatopmg Uh, do you remember the end of the story about the boy who cried "wolf"?

@Meyer Yes, you are so right, there is no indication at all of rising temperatures and increasing drought on a global scale. Those scary scientists are just yanking your chain, like scientists have always done. Where do they get off anyway with their stupid "observations," "evidence," and "facts"? How about that "Higgs-Boson," eh? You want to tell me there's stuff floating around out there I can't even see? Bwahahahaha! What a bunch of loons.
rubberman
3.9 / 5 (7) Sep 12, 2012
Three blind mice....

The top 2 clearly don't keep up with current events and...let's just be clear on this - not drought, but government is causing a food shortage in Zimbabwe, and Cuba. This link shows the per capita water availability for Africa by country. Zimbabwe is the driest.

http://mail.sardc.../p28.jpg

Heres the story on Cuba:

http://www.accuwe...cu/50537

Blaming political policy is too big a stretch on this one Rygg.
NotParker
2.5 / 5 (19) Sep 12, 2012
"The EU is set to limit the use of crop-based biofuels following concerns the technology is not as effective at cutting emissions as previously thought and may conflict with food production, leaked documents suggest."

http://www.busine...biofuels

The greenies fail to understand that burning food in cars causes a food crisis and produces just as much CO2 or even more.

Greenies are at fault. Greenies caused the food crisis. Greenies stupid biofuels push produces more CO2.
ryggesogn2
3 / 5 (10) Sep 12, 2012
"Food is simply not being grown in
sufficient quantities to feed Cuba's population of eleven million
people.

In
1998, Kost reported that around 60% of Cuba's eleven million hectares
could be classed as 'agricultural.' Of that, around 70% was actually
being tilled, and only 20% of the tilled land was also irrigated.
Almost all food crops require irrigation.

From
what we could see in 2008, the percentage of tilled land must now be
much lower. Many many fields lay fallow, and have done for years.
Of the land that is being actively cultivated, most is dedicated to
growing sugar cane, tobacco and citrus fruits for export."
"All farm land is owned by the state. Farmers have
contracts with the state which specify the amount of produce they
must provide to the state, at rates set by the state.

Farmers
we talked to in Cuba uniformly stated that the government did not pay
them enough for the crops they grew. "
http://matadornet...yweldon/
ryggesogn2
3 / 5 (10) Sep 12, 2012
Zimbabwe is now growing tobacco, not food:
http://www.nytime...nted=all

"For decades until Mugabe's land grab in 2000, Zimbabwean farmers were producing surpluses that fed Zambians, whose own agriculture system was moribund.

Then in 2008, then Zambian president Rupiah Banda adopted new policies. Peasant farmers were sold cheap inputs, but they were delivered by September, in good time for farmers to prepare for the rains. Farmers were also closely monitored to ensure they produced crops, and then paid for the fertilizer and seed after they had sold their harvest. If they failed, they were disqualified from inputs the next season.

The result was phenomenal. Last year Zambian farmers produced a record surplus of 1.6 million tonnes — all of it exported to Zimbabwe. "
http://www.soweta...ollapses
TheGhostofOtto1923
1.7 / 5 (17) Sep 12, 2012
Not to worry - lots of religion-inspired depopulating in the works.
http://www.youtub...CgRlwQUA
Food is simply not being grown insufficient quantities to feed Cuba's population of eleven millionpeople.
Yes and just consider how bad things would be now in that religion-dominated little country without the imposed communist martial law and the sanctions which has kept growth in check for generations.

It would look something like this:
http://www.huffin...700.html

-Ravaged, denuded, diseased, miserable. This is what unfettered religion does to a country.

Compare haiti vs the dominican republic:
http://www.guardi...st-haiti
TheGhostofOtto1923
1.8 / 5 (16) Sep 12, 2012
Zimbabwe is now growing tobacco, not food
This restricts pop growth in 2 different ways, doesnt it?

"[Zimbabwe is] the model of a developing country with high birth rates and falling death rates, resulting in relatively high population growth rate (around 3% or above in the 1960s and early 1970s). After a spurt in the period 1980-1983 following independence, a decline in birth rates set in. Since 1991, however, there has been a jump in death rates from a low of 10 per 1000 in 1985 to a high of 25 per 1000 in 2002/2003. It has since subsided to just under 22 per 1000 (estimate for 2007) a little below the birth rate of around 27 per 1000. The high death rate is due to the impact of AIDS, which is by far the main cause of death."

-AIDS also works.

Re zambia, growth-demanding religionist cultures are being destroyed;

"There are, however, positive macroeconomic signs.."

-and this country is being allowed to recover as a result. Applied demographics is not for the faint of heart.
nnoxks
4.5 / 5 (11) Sep 12, 2012
Drought and policy couldn't possibly both contribute to food shortages simultaneously . . . could they?
ryggesogn2
2.8 / 5 (9) Sep 12, 2012
"First, lots of food that is actually produced out in the fields never makes it to markets, at least not in any condition to be eaten. That's because in some developing countries the physical elements of a functioning market – usable roads, efficient transportation and storage facilities – simply haven't received sufficient investment. Secondly, politicians often make matters much worse by attempting to restrict markets when they get nervous about supply. Export bans — on rice during the 2008 food-price spike, for example, or on wheat during the most recent crisis — restrict supply and create uncertainty, driving prices higher."
http://business.t...-crisis/
ryggesogn2
3 / 5 (10) Sep 12, 2012
"Venezuela is one of the world's top oil producers at a time of soaring energy prices, yet shortages of staples like milk, meat and toilet paper are a chronic part of life here, often turning grocery shopping into a hit or miss proposition. "
" Prices are set so low, they say, that companies and producers cannot make a profit. So farmers grow less food, manufacturers cut back production and retailers stock less inventory. Moreover, some of the shortages are in industries, like dairy and coffee, where the government has seized private companies and is now running them, saying it is in the national interest. "
http://www.nytime...nted=all
kochevnik
3.5 / 5 (8) Sep 12, 2012
Greenies are at fault. Greenies caused the food crisis. Greenies stupid biofuels push produces more CO2.
Biofuel isn't necessarily from food. That's not part of the big picture you retard.
ryggesogn2
3 / 5 (10) Sep 12, 2012
"African farmers had little incentive to invest in improving their farms and seeking export markets because they could not compete against subsidised European farmers." {subsidies are socialism, too}
"reforming trade laws would be vital in ensuring maximum yield from existing farmland by removing artificial barriers to free trade."
http://www.theaus...03019977
kochevnik
3 / 5 (10) Sep 12, 2012
@deatopmg Doomsters are nutcases. They are 99.99% wrong but never seem to lose their public adulation nor tax based funding, unlike the boy who cried "wolf" one too many times.
You have no idea what you're talking about. Banksters have infiltrated the futures markets and inflated trading 1000%. Food security is destroyed, replaced with speculation involving parties that can only go long on trades. This means that food prices can double or even rise a magnitude. Consequences will be disastrous to Asian and African nations.

PinkElephant
4.2 / 5 (6) Sep 12, 2012
@nnoxks,

The world is black and white. Shades of gray don't even exist, and you want to talk about colors?! You must be from another planet...
Howhot
3 / 5 (6) Sep 12, 2012
It really is amazing when the green opposition chimes in on an article like this and up pops of an argument like R2's.
How about enacting market reforms that allow food producers to have the tools to raise and sell food without central planning?

And the question I have is; "and we are not doing that how?" is the Tea party that screwed up? I lived on a farm half my life, and I don't ever remember any planning except at the dinner table in winter about what crop would be good for the coming year. The farmers have a better read of what their land will produce than something centralized.

However, given how dangerous AGW is to the survival of mankind in the next 200-300 years, I would think a centralized planing approach might be a good idea. As the human population grows exponentially, and technology improves, central planning will need to be done to avoid mass starvation. I don't see anyway to avoid it R2.

Shootist
3.9 / 5 (11) Sep 12, 2012
"Food crisis" has been eminent for 100 years. Nothing new about Malthusians, nothing new at all.

@Hownot?, You're a card carrying Malthusian, aren't you? I'll bet that if you were 50 years older you'd would of been marching against nuclear power.
ArtflDgr
3.7 / 5 (6) Sep 12, 2012
Biofuel isn't necessarily from food. That's not part of the big picture you retard.

actually they are..

This year, an estimated 4.3 billion bushels of corn will go to ethanol production under a federal mandate to blend 36 billion gallons of biofuel into gasoline by 2022, of which 15 billion gallons would come from corn.

Based on the estimate of 56 pounds of corn per bushel, 15 billion gallons of corn-based ethanol in 2022 would require almost six billion bushels of corn, or more than half of this year's estimated national corn crop. The U.S. Department of Agriculture currently estimates that 37 percent of America's corn goes to ethanol production.

And i can tell you from the last two times i was in indonesia, they grow corn for ethanol (they eat rice mostly, and not much corn. (though in trawas tourist area has some who cook it up very spicy)

ryggesogn2
2.8 / 5 (11) Sep 12, 2012
central planning will need to be done to avoid mass starvation. I don't see anyway to avoid it R2.

Central planning leads to starvation EVERY time. Data doesn't lie. You believe AGW data but not the history of communist central planning failures?

Israel has created a garden in the middle east, with limited water. Ever hear of Vertical Farming?
Unless entrepreneurs can be rewarded for these innovations and investments, why would any govt bureaucrat be motivated to innovate?
ryggesogn2
3.2 / 5 (9) Sep 13, 2012
"Far to the south, close to Bordeaux France, other exceptional farmers apply hydroponic technology to gain an edge in the marketplace. Michel and Claire Meklis, owners of "La Petite Fleur" grow Alpine strawberries, by far the most delicious variety and the most difficult to grow. Delectable and perfectly sweet., it's unfortunate that these strawberries deteriorate rapidly after harvest. They are especially susceptible to disease; consequently very few farmers would dare raise them commercially. For 13 years, Michel and Claire have successfully cultivated Alpines and today they export them to markets as far away as Sweden. The Meklis' have combined a unique hydroponic method - perlite in columnar hanging plastic bags plus a variety of Alpine which seems to produce hardy fruit, hardy enough to survive transport to distant markets."
http://generalhyd...hnology/
Howhot
2 / 5 (4) Sep 13, 2012
Central planning leads to starvation EVERY time. Data doesn't lie. You believe AGW data but not the history of communist...


R2, Data doesn't lie? I think your making crap up. What data are you talking about? I actually know communism very well, and also it's benefits as a method of governance. It seems to work pretty well for some. Personally I like Democracy.

The issue that will confront us (the world population) is how to manage the food shortages that WILL be coming from global warming.
As much as it seems easy to blow off, AGW is the 800lb gorilla in the room for mankind's existence in the next 200-300 years. If the tea party doesn't deal with this issue, people will starve.

enigma13x
3 / 5 (4) Sep 13, 2012
i would just like to add that china is currently buying up farmland all over the world if they had nothing to fear about food shortages why would they be doing that.. as for corn being used in bio fuel that was mandated by the us gov not the greens bio fuel dose not need to be made out of food crops i just wonder how many senators had investments in corn futures when that decision was made
Jitterbewegung
1.9 / 5 (9) Sep 13, 2012
Droughts are good they attract the rain;-)

http://phys.org/n...rms.html
Claudius
3 / 5 (6) Sep 13, 2012
"... actions to address the changes in the physical climate" So do they think reducing CO2 emissions will "address the change"? They should read this:

"The phase relation between atmospheric carbon dioxide and global temperature" (http://www.scienc...2001658)

Highlights of the study:

"Changes in global atmospheric CO2 are lagging about 11–12 months behind changes in global sea surface temperature.

Changes in global atmospheric CO2 are lagging 9.5-10 months behind changes in global air surface temperature.

Changes in global atmospheric CO2 are lagging about 9 months behind changes in global lower troposphere temperature.

Changes in ocean temperatures appear to explain a substantial part of the observed changes in atmospheric CO2 since January 1980.

CO2 released from use of fossil fuels have little influence on the observed changes in the amount of atmospheric CO2, and changes in atmospheric CO2 are not tracking changes in human emissions."
Claudius
3.3 / 5 (7) Sep 13, 2012
Before making drastic changes, settle the science first.
VendicarD
2.6 / 5 (5) Sep 13, 2012
Today there is more bad news for the Denialists.

Arctic ice area has reached another new low. Never before in human history has there been a ice area low this extreme.

Current Arctic Ice area now stands at 2.26 million square kilometers a full two weeks after Parker Tard told a whopper of a lie that Arctic ice was increasing.

In fact it has fallen a half million kilometers since then.

It looks as if the melt will probably continue for another couple of days at least.

An astonishingly long melt season, even though ParkerTard predicted that it would be among the shortest in recent years.

Poor ParkerTard. Reality never seems to agree with what he is saying.
ryggesogn2
3.5 / 5 (8) Sep 13, 2012
It seems to work pretty well for some.

Communism works out quite well, for a while, for the leaders like Castro, or the communist party leaders in China. Not so much for the masses.
rubberman
3.9 / 5 (7) Sep 13, 2012
Claudius - For a million years prior to humans burning fossil fuels the PPM concentration never went above 290. At the end of 2012 we will be over 400PPM on average. Can you provide a link to a peer reviewed paper that supports the one you have linked? I only ask because an almost 50% increase in atmospheric CO2 over the high end of natural variability of the last million years, with no other viable explanation as to it's source, is a pretty big discrepancy that isn't mentioned on your previous link.
Claudius
2.9 / 5 (7) Sep 13, 2012
Can you provide a link to a peer reviewed paper that supports the one you have linked?


So now it's not enough to present the results of a peer reviewed paper, one must now provide a peer reviewed paper that supports the peer reviewed paper. Astonishing. And if I did that, would I then need to provide a peer reviewed paper that supported the peer reviewed paper that supports the peer reviewed paper? And how many turtles are there? All the way down.

"... and changes in atmospheric CO2 are not tracking changes in human emissions."
TheGhostofOtto1923
1.5 / 5 (13) Sep 13, 2012
" Prices are set so low, they say, that companies and producers cannot make a profit. So farmers grow less food, manufacturers cut back production and retailers stock less inventory. Moreover, some of the shortages are in industries, like dairy and coffee, where the government has seized private companies and is now running them, saying it is in the national interest. "
-This is also a clever way of restricting growth.
Communism works out quite well, for a while, for the leaders like Castro, or the communist party leaders in China. Not so much for the masses.
-Exactly. The people will be made to surrender their obsolete, virulent, ruinous cultures one way or another. The best and brightest can choose the pragmatic route and emigrate, which is often made difficult to enhance the filtering Process. But those who remain will continue to suffer, and fight, and die. And their cultures will die with them.
ryggesogn2
2.8 / 5 (9) Sep 13, 2012
last million years

The earth is over 4 billion years old. Life has been on earth for 3 billion years.
3 billion is 3000 million. 1 million / 3000 million is .00033.
What was the CO2 for the other 2999 million years?
Claudius
2.5 / 5 (8) Sep 13, 2012
Today there is more bad news for the Denialists.


Only if you define denialist as "one who denies that climate changes."

If you define it as "one who is skeptical of anthropogenic climate change" your statement does not apply.
NotParker
3.5 / 5 (8) Sep 13, 2012
Greenies are at fault. Greenies caused the food crisis. Greenies stupid biofuels push produces more CO2.
Biofuel isn't necessarily from food. That's not part of the big picture you retard.


99.9% of it is from food or from land that should be growing food, but subsidies cause the farmer to grow food for biofuels.

If a farmer has 100 acres of corn for food and 200 acres for animal feed corn and 200 acres for biofuel corn, and bad weather causes crops to be at 75% of their usual yield, and ethanol producers pay more for corn, then the farmer will sell them food and cattle corn.

That makes beef and food corn more expensive. If food corn is more expensive the wheat grower can raise his prices because consumers substitute.

It has a horrible cascade effect that distorts the market.
rubberman
3.4 / 5 (5) Sep 13, 2012
Claudius - I realize the vicious cycle of my request. I'll be more specific, the paper you linked, although peer reviewed used the HADCRUT3 data instead of HADCRUT4. This means that the arctic region was not included in the dataset...the area where the most changes are taking place. Secondly, as I mentioned before, a plus 100PPM increase since we started burning stored carbon is a pretty glaring correlation to make a statement that CO2 rise doesn't track human emissions.

RYGG - The last million years demonstrate climatic variability under modern conditions. The discussion is about the Anthropogenic nature of CO2 rise. You go have fun studying the previous 4 billion years and let us all know what riveting intellectual gems you come up with.
NotParker
3 / 5 (10) Sep 13, 2012
Claudius - I realize the vicious cycle of my request. I'll be more specific, the paper you linked, although peer reviewed used the HADCRUT3 data instead of HADCRUT4. This means that the arctic region was not included in the dataset


HADCRUT3 has some arctic data as you can see from the maps.

http://sunshineho...5-years/

HADCRUT4 is missing the cold 2011 and 2012 temperatures.

Why would you repeat VD's propaganda. Unless you are VD?
ryggesogn2
3.2 / 5 (9) Sep 13, 2012
rubber, when CO2 WAS higher over 1 million years ago the the planet thrived doesn't matter as it is not 'modern'?
What was so different 1 million years ago?

According to this,
http://www.geocra...e277.gif

CO2 was falling 65 million years ago while temperatures were stable.
rubberman
2.6 / 5 (5) Sep 13, 2012
"What was so different 1 million years ago?"

For starters...the human population.

"CO2 was falling 65 million years ago while temperatures were stable"

65 million years ago the earth barely resembles the configuration of the continents we have today. Ocean circulation was totally different, the Milankovich cycles were a non factor, the temperature was warm (although the CO2 concentration was considerably higher as well) Your link is interesting, there is a glaring discrepancy at the PETM where the uptick in CO2 appears to be missing, yet we know for this event the increase was on the order of 700-1000PPM . Also, we know that the relationship between temperature and CO2 is logarithmic (150 PPM means way more when added to 250PPM than when added to 500PPM).
Claudius
2.6 / 5 (5) Sep 13, 2012
Secondly, as I mentioned before, a plus 100PPM increase since we started burning stored carbon is a pretty glaring correlation to make a statement that CO2 rise doesn't track human emissions.


I think the point was that CO2 levels lag temperature increases.In other words, CO2 levels are going up as a result of increasing temperatures, not the other way around. The idea that temperature is being driven by increasing CO2 levels is not supported by the evidence.
djr
4.3 / 5 (6) Sep 13, 2012
"CO2 levels are going up as a result of increasing temperatures"
Hold on - hold on. Recently Parker and Uba and others have been having long arguments about how temperatures have been flat for 15 years. The claim is that there has been no significant warming for 15 years. Now C02 levels continue to increase - right?
http://en.wikiped...e-en.svg

So - C02 levels are continuing to increase. Temperatures are flat. But you say - "CO2 levels are going up as a result of increasing temperatures" Something don't add up!!!!!

Howhot
1 / 5 (1) Sep 14, 2012
I think you nailed it Rubberman,
NotParker
3.5 / 5 (8) Sep 14, 2012
"CO2 levels are going up as a result of increasing temperatures"
Hold on - hold on. Recently Parker and Uba and others have been having long arguments about how temperatures have been flat for 15 years. The claim is that there has been no significant warming for 15 years. Now C02 levels continue to increase - right?
http://en.wikiped...e-en.svg

So - C02 levels are continuing to increase. Temperatures are flat. But you say - "CO2 levels are going up as a result of increasing temperatures" Something don't add up!!!!!



You forget that China is cooling the earth with massive increases in sulfates from their coal plants.

Remember, climate is not just one variable, even though your cult tries to get people to believe that only CO2 changes temperature.

ryggesogn2
3.5 / 5 (8) Sep 14, 2012
Rubber, what was the human population 1 million years ago and when did humans learn to control fire?
Howhot
1.3 / 5 (3) Sep 14, 2012
Rubber, what was the human population 1 million years ago and when did humans learn to control fire?

Don't ask a rhetorical question if you can't answer it R2.

You forget that China is cooling the earth with massive increases in sulfates from their coal plants.


If that was the case, we would all be complaining about Global Cooling caused by China's massive use of Coal. Since we are not; and just the opposite is true, we can complain about China's use of coal and it global effect on CO2 levels and visa-vi global warming.

The bottom line though, in spite of the arguments Noparks and R2 makes, is the human population will have to feed itself and is growing exponentially. With global warming crop lands will be under increased stress and will not be capable of sustaining the populations. The end results in not pretty.

When people are desperate, they will do very desperate things and the Soylent Green scenario is not that far off.

ryggesogn2
4 / 5 (8) Sep 14, 2012
One million years ago there were ~20,000 humans on the entire planet.
When they started using fire ranges from 500-1000 thousand years ago.
Rubber asserts the campfires of 20,000 humans caused global warming?
Meyer
4 / 5 (4) Sep 15, 2012
Arctic ice area has reached another new low. Never before in human history has there been a ice area low this extreme.

Not surprising. The northern hemisphere was covered in glaciers for most of human history. It wasn't until a period of rapid warming that our species began to thrive. Perhaps we will find a way to prevent future glaciation before it's too late.
jonnyboy
1 / 5 (2) Sep 16, 2012
it will be interesting to see if they can eat oil.
NotParker
2.3 / 5 (3) Sep 16, 2012

If that was the case, we would all be complaining about Global Cooling caused by China's massive use of Coal. Since we are not ...


" Scientists have come up with a possible explanation for why the rise in Earth's temperature paused for a bit during the 2000s, one of the hottest decades on record.

The answer seems counterintuitive. It's all that sulfur pollution in the air from China's massive coal-burning, according to a new study.

Sulfur particles in the air deflect the sun's rays and can temporarily cool things down a bit. That can happen even as coal-burning produces the carbon dioxide that contributes to global warming."

http://www.huffin...897.html

Try and keep up.
Shootist
3.4 / 5 (5) Sep 16, 2012
Growing seasons were longer and more fruitful during the Roman Climate Optimum.

Damnthematrix
5 / 5 (2) Sep 20, 2012
Cuba, Zimbabwe, and Venezuela - just to quote three of the most mentioned nations in this thread - are TROPICAL in climate. Growing conventional food in such places is difficult at best. I know, I live in Sub Tropical Australia, and I grow most of the food we eat using Permaculture principles. I can only grow European crops in winter. Summers are too hot and too wet for anything but alternative crops like Tahitian Spinach, sweet potatoes, corn and bananas.

This is why places like Cuba grow sugar cane and tobacco. They thrive in the conditions! I've met Cubans in Australia who came here to explain how they dealt with their Peak Oil crisis when the USSR collapsed and stopped supplying them with oil. Yes there was a food crisis, but they solved it using organic and Permaculture principles. I don't believe they are now starving, though of course they are not overnourished and obese like Americans...

Cuba, Zimbabwe, and Venezuela might also have surpassed their carrying capacity.
ryggesogn2
2.3 / 5 (3) Sep 20, 2012
Cuba, Zimbabwe, and Venezuela might also have surpassed their carrying capacity.

No,its called socialism.
"Farmers in the Soviet Union cut back on how much time and effort they invested in growing their crops, when they realized that the government was going to take a big part of the harvest. They slaughtered and ate young farm animals that they would normally keep tending and feeding while raising them to maturity."
http://www.realcl...502.html
Damnthematrix
5 / 5 (2) Sep 20, 2012
You have no idea...... have you even TRIED growing vegies in a tropical climate?
Howhot
5 / 5 (1) Sep 20, 2012
Did you hear the words that matter R2? It is "carrying capacity". That is what will make or break the world.
ryggesogn2
2.3 / 5 (3) Sep 21, 2012
You have no idea...... have you even TRIED growing vegies in a tropical climate?

Vegetables are grown all over the world in tropical climates.
ryggesogn2
2.3 / 5 (3) Sep 21, 2012
Did you hear the words that matter R2? It is "carrying capacity". That is what will make or break the world.

Socialism defines carrying capacity, not land, water, energy, ingenuity or capital.
ryggesogn2
2.3 / 5 (3) Sep 21, 2012
Tropical vegetables:
"Ilocanos are not finicky eaters. Eggplant, ampalaya (bitter gourd) or okra are sometimes just broiled and eaten with a dip made of fish paste and vinegar or calamansi. Salutoys is often prepared as matimtim, cooked in vinegar, water, fish paste, garlic and salt. Vegetables like saluyot and okra are favored for their slimy textures.

They also have different kinds of salads. Ampalaya leaves, squasjh tops, eel grass, pipino, pako (fern), kangkong, kulot (a kind of sewed), pallang (winged bean), string bean, marunggay leaves, susop (banana blossom) and camote (a kind of rootcrop) tops are just some of the vegetables they use for salads. These are mixed with ginger, onions, vinegar, black pepper, calamansi, fish sauce and fish paste, and garnished with tomatoes.
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http://www.museoi...howall=1

"A-Z list of warm climate and tropical vegetables"
http://www.tropic...getables
ryggesogn2
2.3 / 5 (3) Sep 21, 2012
"I find growing tropical vegetable gardens much easier than growing anything in Europe. In the tropics I can grow all the vegetables I need, all year round.

Sure, there are things I miss and still buy (Garlic! And Lindt chocolate...) But mostly I have adpated my cooking and diet to where I live. Growing tropical vegetables makes sense and it makes the tropical gardeners life easy.

I can still grow, cook and eat my European favourites during winter. And during summer there will be more of the wonderful exotic and Asian dishes on the menu."
http://www.tropic...les.html