Related topics: climate change · drought

Czech Republic drought visible from space

The prolonged period of dry weather in the Czech Republic has resulted in what experts are calling the 'worst drought in 500 years.' Scientists are using ESA satellite data to monitor the drought that's gripped the country.

Rain has eased the dry, but more is needed to break the drought

After the intensely dry conditions of 2019, January and February have brought much-needed rain. Dams in many cities and towns were replenished and some farmers may be able to grow a crop for the first time in several seasons. ...

High-def mapping of moisture in the soil

Soil moisture is easy to see when your favorite Little Leaguer slides into second base the day after a big summer storm. The mud splattered on that little hustler's uniform tells the story.

AI magic bean could save farmers millions

Farmers across the world could jack up giant profits using an Artificial Intelligence soil monitoring system developed at Brunel University London.

NASA soil data joins the Air Force

Getting stuck on a muddy road is a hassle for anyone, but for the U.S. Army it could be far more serious—a matter of life and death in some parts of the world. That's one of the reasons the U.S. Air Force HQ 557th Weather ...

Video: SMOS 10 years in orbit

The ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite has been in orbit for a decade. This remarkable satellite has not only exceeded its planned life in orbit, but also surpassed its original scientific goals. It was ...

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Water content

Water content or moisture content is the quantity of water contained in a material, such as soil (called soil moisture), rock, ceramics, or wood on a volumetric or gravimetric basis. The property is used in a wide range of scientific and technical areas, and is expressed as a ratio, which can range from 0 (completely dry) to the value of the materials' porosity at saturation.

Volumetric water content, θ, is defined mathematically as:

where Vw is the volume of water and VT = Vs + Vv = Vs + Vw + Va is the total volume (that is Soil Volume + Water Volume + Void Space). Water content may also be based on its mass or weight, thus the gravimetric water content is defined as:

where mw is the mass of water and mb (or ms for soil) is the bulk material mass. To convert gravimetric water content to volumetric water, multiply the gravimetric water content by the bulk specific gravity of the material.

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