Molecule reorganises itself for new functions

August 22, 2012

(Phys.org) -- The discovery of a synthetic molecule, made up of 60 simple components that are able to reorganise themselves to produce new functions, will lead to better understanding of nature's processes.

The incredibly complex structure of the pentagonal prismatic molecule was discovered when researchers working at The University of Queensland (UQ), The University of Cambridge, and Randolph-Macon College in the USA, formed the structure by transforming a tetrahedral molecule into a second structure - a barrel-like pentagonal prism.

Understanding the structure of which are able to reorganise themselves is important as it helps scientists to understand natural processes in such as which are assembled from small parts.

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A video of the product molecule

The finding was published this month in the journal Nature Chemistry and the researchers have produced a movie showing the molecule and its 60 simple components to assist readers to understand its complexity.

In synthesising the molecule, the researchers used a technique known as “self-assembly”, which regulates many of the and functional components in biological systems like DNA, to prepare a molecular tetrahedron from twenty-two simple building blocks.

The building blocks employed were then chemically programmed to spontaneously react together to form the desired molecule.

UQ's School of & Molecular Biosciences Dr Jack Clegg said in addition of a chemical template, the tetrahedral molecule was reconfigured into a new barrel-like structure composed of an impressive 60 smaller molecules.

“Up until now we've only be able to do this on a very basic level,” Dr Clegg said.

"We've succeeded in preparing and characterising a new chemical system that is capable of structural reconstitution on receipt of one molecular signal to create a tight binding pocket for a chloride anion."

Explore further: Scientists build a better DNA molecule

More information: Nature Chemistry ( DOI:10.1038/NCHEM.1407 , published online 5 August 2012).

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