Nature Chemistry is a monthly journal dedicated to publishing high-quality papers that describe the most significant and cutting-edge research in all areas of chemistry. As well as reflecting the traditional core subjects of analytical, inorganic, organic and physical chemistry, the journal also features a broad range of chemical research including, but not limited to, catalysis, computational and theoretical chemistry, environmental chemistry, green chemistry, medicinal chemistry, nuclear chemistry, polymer chemistry, supramolecular chemistry and surface chemistry. Other cross-disciplinary topics such as bioinorganic, bioorganic, organometallic and physical–organic chemistry will also be featured. The submission of manuscripts detailing multidisciplinary research performed at the interface of chemistry and other scientific fields of inquiry such as biology, materials science, nanotechnology and physics is also encouraged, where the central theme of the work — and the major advances that are reported — fall within the bounds of chemistry.

Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
History
2009--present
Website
http://www.nature.com/nchem
Impact factor
17.927 (2010)

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A gentler, more precise laser cutting technique

Laser cutting techniques are usually powered by high energy beams, so hot that they melt most materials. Now scientists from McGill University have developed a gentler, more precise technique using low-power visible light.

New PET-like plastic made directly from waste biomass

It is becoming increasingly obvious that moving away from fossil fuels and avoiding the accumulation of plastics in the environment are key to addressing the challenge of climate change. In that vein, there are considerable ...

Upcycling plastics through dynamic cross-linking

If bioengineers can upcycle commodity plastics into higher-performance materials, they can establish sustained closed-loop manufacturing with broader industrial and environmental benefits. For example, upcycled plastics can ...

Biochemists use new tool to control mRNA by means of light

A team of researchers at the Institute of Biochemistry at Münster University discovered that by using so-called FlashCaps they were able to control the translation of mRNA by means of light. The results have been published ...

Another step toward synthetic cells

Building functional synthetic cells from the bottom-up is an ongoing effort of scientists around the globe. Their use in studying cellular mechanisms in a highly controlled and pre-defined setting creates great value for ...

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