Nature Chemistry is a monthly journal dedicated to publishing high-quality papers that describe the most significant and cutting-edge research in all areas of chemistry. As well as reflecting the traditional core subjects of analytical, inorganic, organic and physical chemistry, the journal also features a broad range of chemical research including, but not limited to, catalysis, computational and theoretical chemistry, environmental chemistry, green chemistry, medicinal chemistry, nuclear chemistry, polymer chemistry, supramolecular chemistry and surface chemistry. Other cross-disciplinary topics such as bioinorganic, bioorganic, organometallic and physical–organic chemistry will also be featured. The submission of manuscripts detailing multidisciplinary research performed at the interface of chemistry and other scientific fields of inquiry such as biology, materials science, nanotechnology and physics is also encouraged, where the central theme of the work — and the major advances that are reported — fall within the bounds of chemistry.

Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
History
2009--present
Website
http://www.nature.com/nchem
Impact factor
17.927 (2010)

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Making heads or tails out of phospholipid synthesis

Most scientists agree that life on Earth began about 4 billion years ago, but they don't agree where—on land or in water. They know that about 2 billion years ago, single-celled organisms evolved into complex plants and ...

Oligomeric materials to enhance water splitting

Researchers from the Llobet group have developed a new molecular material made out of oligomers and used it as a catalyst in water oxidation, achieving unprecedented current densities for molecular catalysts. The paper "Water ...

Reducing nitrogen with boron and beer

Humankind is reliant on the ammonium in synthetic fertilizer for food. However, producing ammonia from nitrogen is extremely energy-intensive and requires the use of transition metals.

Seeing chemical reactions with music

Albert Einstein once said, "I see my life in terms of music." Perhaps inspired by his words, scientists at the Center for Self-assembly and Complexity (CSC), within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea) now see ...

Two-for-one energy from photons, now better than ever

In the twisting and turning of long organic molecules, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers have found a promising group of materials for tomorrow's super-efficient solar cells.

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