Researchers find more evidence of quantum processes at work in photosynthesis

Dec 07, 2011 by Bob Yirka report

(PhysOrg.com) -- Researchers working together from the University of Chicago and Washington University in St. Louis, have found more evidence that suggests quantum effects are at play as plants use energy from the sun to turn carbon dioxide into organic compounds. As they write in their paper, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, there appears to be a link between coherence and the way energy flows in plants.

The team contrived an experiment based on prior research that has suggested, but not shown, a link between molecules separated in space that are able to interact with one another - but are not separated in time () and the way energy flows in plants that use to, in effect, create their own food from the air.

Prior to this new research, scientists have been able to observe coherence in the protein cells involved in harvesting light in certain bacteria, which appeared to last longer than it rightfully should have; first only at very cold temperatures, then later, in virtually all plants at room temperature. This caused physicists to theorize that there must be a very efficient system of transferring energy going on, whereby some means was allowing every conceivable chlorophyll path to be “mapped” simultaneously, allowing for a shortest route to be chosen before any processing actually began; hence the theorizing that may be at work.

To find out for sure, the team studied the way lasers fluctuated as they moved through the antenna proteins, keeping track of the way the fluctuations shifted. In so doing they found an obvious link between the fluctuations and the way energy flowed that could easily be described by common trigonometric functions. This result means the team was able to demonstrate in a clear way, that coherence really is involved in the way that energy is transported during photosynthesis, which means that as far as photosynthesis is concerned, micro-biologists are likely going to have to go back and take a new fresh look at what is really going on in a process that was up till now, thought to be rather well understood.

The research team, led by Greg Engel, sum up their findings by succinctly noting that the simple protein cells found in plants obviously play a more vital role in photosynthesis than anyone previously thought.

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More information: G. Panitchayangkoon, D.V. Voronine, D. Abramavicius, J.R. Caram, N. Lewis, S. Mukamel, and G.S. Engel, "Direct Evidence of Quantum Transport in Photosynthetic Light-harvesting Complexes." PNAS (accepted) 2011

The Engel group page: engelgroup.uchicago.edu/index.html

via Wired

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kevinrtrs
1.4 / 5 (10) Dec 07, 2011
This caused physicists to theorize that there must be a very efficient system of transferring energy going on, whereby some means was allowing every conceivable chlorophyll path to be mapped simultaneously, allowing for a shortest route to be chosen before any processing actually began


Seems like the evolutionists will have their work cut out for them to explain the presence of such subliminal quantum effects in plants. This is besides the already daunting task of making any kind of sense for the evolution of plants because right now there doesn't seem to have been any! Those papers that have been published have simply raised the attention to just how much is still in dispute - to the extend that it hasn't gotten off the ground yet.

Really very interesting times ahead if you're still of the opinion that life just happened by chance.
Noumenon
5 / 5 (47) Dec 07, 2011
Kevin, while it may not be possible to resoundingly prove evolution, it is orders of magnitude more rational than creation for the following reason;

If God just Created everything without a genesis in accord with discoverable physical law,... eventually man will discover this 'seam in reality' existing between empirical observation and the 'hand of God'. This would be a profound absurdity for a perfect God,.. so He had better have arranged things in accordance with rational theories based on observations.
Noumenon
5 / 5 (46) Dec 07, 2011
I think Penrose's idea of quantum effects responsible for consciousness is profoundly interesting.
Callippo
2.5 / 5 (2) Dec 07, 2011
The pigment array in thylakoid lamellas i.e. quantasomes appear pretty similar to quantum dots arrays. Each quantosome contains about 230 to 300 chlorophyll molecules. They're regularly spaced in 150 x 180 A lattice, in similar way like the Abrikosov quantum vortices in superconductors or quantum dots at semiconductors. All the molecules in each of these photo-synthetic units are spaced and oriented in such a way, captured photons are transferred from molecule to molecule by inductive resonance and the energy absorbed is transferred to as exciton. This arrangement increases the quantum efficiency of photosynthesis by about 8 percent.

Experiments have demonstrated, that the presence of the quantosome particles in chloroplast membrane is not a necessary condition for photoreduction activity of chloroplasts [J. Mol. Biol., 27, 323 (1967)] In prokaryotes pigments are distributed uniformly on or in the thylakoid lamellae.
Ionian
4.6 / 5 (9) Dec 07, 2011
Kevin,
Nothing "subliminal" going on here. Quantum physics is just physics, it's not magical or supernatural.
Nanobanano
2 / 5 (4) Dec 07, 2011
The term "subliminal" has nothing to do with magic or the supernatural, idiot.

It means "below the threshold", which in the application Kevin used it regarding quantum physics, it's usage was actually perfectly fine.

Perhaps you need to develop your vocabulary skills, as do the two idiots who gave you a 5.
aroc91
5 / 5 (3) Dec 07, 2011
Seems like the evolutionists will have their work cut out for them to explain the presence of such subliminal quantum effects in plants. This is besides the already daunting task of making any kind of sense for the evolution of plants because right now there doesn't seem to have been any! Those papers that have been published have simply raised the attention to just how much is still in dispute - to the extend that it hasn't gotten off the ground yet.

Really very interesting times ahead if you're still of the opinion that life just happened by chance.


How exactly does an intrinsic, emergent property of matter have any bearing on the ability for it to make complex interactions with itself? It's not as if the alleged ancient photosynthetic cyanobacteria ACTIVELY decided to take advantage of it. That's just the way it happened to be. Moron.
jarrod_merlin
3 / 5 (4) Dec 07, 2011
wow, after reading some of his comments about the 1% in the other article, i have to say, i do not like nerdyguy, his politics, or his idiotic, moronic ravings about anything. i cant wait till next November, when we can tell all you right wing chicken hawk assholes to blow it out your ass. the country is tired of trickle down economics. go to hell nerdyguy
aroc91
not rated yet Dec 08, 2011
wow, after reading some of his comments about the 1% in the other article, i have to say, i do not like nerdyguy, his politics, or his idiotic, moronic ravings about anything. i cant wait till next November, when we can tell all you right wing chicken hawk assholes to blow it out your ass. the country is tired of trickle down economics. go to hell nerdyguy


How very relevant.

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