Resistance to antibiotics is ancient: study

Aug 31, 2011

Scientists were surprised at how fast bacteria developed resistance to the miracle antibiotic drugs when they were developed less than a century ago. Now scientists at McMaster University have found that resistance has been around for at least 30,000 years.

Research findings published today in the science journal Nature show is a that predates the modern clinical . for the study are Gerry Wright, scientific director of the Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research and Hendrik Poinar, McMaster evolutionary geneticist.

"Antibiotic resistance is seen as a current problem and the fact that antibiotics are becoming less effective because of resistance spreading in hospitals is a known fact," said Wright. "The big question is where does all of this resistance come from?"

After years of studying extracted from soil frozen in 30,000-year-old permafrost from the Yukon Territories, the researchers were able to develop methods to isolate DNA within McMaster's Ancient DNA Centre. Using state-of-the-art molecular biological techniques, methods were developed to tease out small stretches of .

Researchers discovered antibiotic resistant genes existed beside genes that encoded DNA for ancient life, such as mammoths, horse and bison as well as plants only found in that locality during the last in the Pleistocene era, at least 30,000 years ago. They focused on a specific area of antibiotic resistance to the drug vancomycin, a significant clinical problem that emerged in 1980s and continues to be associated with outbreaks of hospital-acquired infections worldwide.

"We identified that these genes were present in the permafrost at depths consistent with the age of the other DNAs, such as the . Brian Golding of McMaster's Department of Biology showed that these were not contemporary, but formed part of the same family tree. We then recreated the gene product in the lab, purified its protein and showed that it had the same activity and structure then as it does now."

This is only the second time an ancient protein has been 'revived' in a laboratory setting.

Wright said the breakthrough will have important impact on the understanding of antibiotic resistance: "Antibiotics are part of the natural ecology of the planet so when we think that we have developed some drug that won't be susceptible to resistance or some new thing to use in medicine, we are completely kidding ourselves. These things are part of our natural world and therefore we need to be incredibly careful in how we use them. Microorganisms have figured out a way of how to get around them well before we even figured out how to use them."

Poinar says this discovery has opened doors for ancient antibiotic resistance research. "We can go back a million years in the permafrost, which is our next goal."

Funding for this project came from the Canada Research Chairs program, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council.

Explore further: Two-armed control of ATR, a master regulator of the DNA damage checkpoint

Related Stories

Study unveils lifeline for 'antibiotic of last resort'

Apr 11, 2010

A new study led by the scientific director of the Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research has uncovered for the first time how bacteria recognize and develop resistance to a powerful antibiotic used ...

A world without antibiotics?

Apr 07, 2011

Imagine a world without antibiotics. Common infections are life threatening. Pneumonia, urinary tract infections and venereal diseases are incurable. Cancer chemotherapies do not exist. The life expectancy for Canadian men ...

Antibiotic resistance spreads rapidly between bacteria

Apr 11, 2011

The part of bacterial DNA that often carries antibiotic resistance is a master at moving between different types of bacteria and adapting to widely differing bacterial species, shows a study made by a research ...

Researchers discover a new antibacterial lead

Sep 27, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Antibiotic resistance has been a significant problem for hospitals and health-care facilities for more than a decade. But despite the need for new treatment options, there have been only two ...

Researcher studies drug-resistant bacteria in environment

Mar 19, 2008

Water is essential to life, but the water we drink to stay alive could also be making us sick. Lesley Warren, associate professor in the School of Geography & Earth Sciences, is studying the interaction between ...

Recommended for you

Japanese scientist resigns over stem cell scandal

Dec 19, 2014

A researcher embroiled in a fabrication scandal that has rocked Japan's scientific establishment said Friday she would resign after failing to reproduce results of what was once billed as a ground-breaking study on ...

'Hairclip' protein mechanism explained

Dec 18, 2014

Research led by the Teichmann group on the Wellcome Genome Campus has identified a fundamental mechanism for controlling protein function. Published in the journal Science, the discovery has wide-ranging implications for bi ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Telekinetic
not rated yet Aug 31, 2011
This research could unleash "The Blob", which, by the end of the movie, was left to stay dormant in the ice-cold arctic. I wouldn't want that kind of responsibility. I hate defrosting frozen pizza.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.