Antibacterial prodrug by targeting intracellular metabolite

National University of Singapore researchers have developed an approach to selectively target pathogenic bacteria by harnessing an intracellular metabolite known as formate, abundant in these bacteria, as a new antimicrobial ...

Key genetic clue missing in fight against superbugs

For the first time, researchers have discovered how antibiotic resistance genes are spreading, at a continental scale, via bacterial plasmids in the hospital superbug, Klebsiella pneumoniae.

Research opens the way to new drugs

Research by a team at Te Herenga Waka–Victoria University of Wellington's School of Biological Sciences dispels the belief that on the assembly line of enzymes there is a "proof-reading" mechanism that ensures molecules ...

An unprecedented discovery of cell fusion

Like humans, bacteria live together in communities, sometimes lending a hand—or in the case of bacteria, a metabolite or two—to help their neighbors thrive. Understanding how bacteria interact is critical to solving growing ...

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Antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic resistance is the ability of a microorganism to withstand the effects of antibiotics. It is a specific type of drug resistance. Antibiotic resistance evolves via natural selection acting upon random mutation, but it can also be engineered by applying an evolutionary stress on a population. Once such a gene is generated, bacteria can then transfer the genetic information in a horizontal fashion (between individuals) by plasmid exchange. If a bacterium carries several resistance genes, it is called multiresistant or, informally, a superbug. The term antimicrobial resistance is sometimes used to explicitly encompass organisms other than bacteria.

Antibiotic resistance can also be introduced artificially into a microorganism through transformation protocols. This can aid in implanting artificial genes into the microorganism. If the resistance gene is linked with the gene to be implanted, the antibiotic can be used to kill off organisms that lack the new gene.

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