Jetpacks + dummy tests = seven minutes in heaven (w/ video)

Apr 06, 2011 by Katie Gatto weblog

(PhysOrg.com) -- The jetpack has been a staple of the science fiction lovers dreams since before the early days of space travel. The idea that one can get from place to place with a big rocket strapped to your back has appealed to the human sense of possibility. It is a kind of freedom that, as yet, humans have been unable to enjoy. Sure, hopping on a jet plane may get you there, once you have endured the long lines and the potentially invasive customs check, but strapping of a jet pack is much, much cooler.

The idea of a jetpack is not new, but what about its implementation? As it turns out, that is not so new either. In 2008 researchers at Martin Jetpack created a prototype of their very own jetpack. Though, the pack is much bigger than you would picture. Instead of two neat cylinders strapped to your back, and held on by a seat belt style of device, this is actually much larger than the person who flies it. It looks almost like a lunar landing pod.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

Much more recently, this week in fact, the pack got its first real test. The remote controlled jetpack was spotted flying around with a dummy for a few minutes. The dummy, which has been weighted to simulate the weight distribution of a , was air born for seven minutes. While this may not sound like a long flight, it is the current record for this pack.

Jetpacks + dummy tests = seven minutes in heaven (w/ video)

This pack is still in its early stages of testing and no information about a release date have been announced at this time, so jetpack fans will have to wait a little bit longer.

Explore further: Audi tests its A7 driverless vehicle on Florida highway

More information: martinjetpack.com/

Related Stories

Google Announces the Google Pack

Jan 08, 2006

Google announced the Google Pack beta, a free collection of useful software from Google and other companies that improves the user experience online and on the desktop. In just a few clicks, users can install ...

Firefox 4 Beta 1: Overview of Changes and Performance

Jul 08, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- In the latest version of Firefox's free, open-source Web browser, you will notice some visual changes like tabs on top similar to Google Chrome and single button menu similar to Office 2007. ...

Recommended for you

Why let your sales force influence product prices?

41 minutes ago

From the outside, you might not notice the ongoing tension within many large businesses: the battle between salespeople, on the one hand, and marketers and product managers, on the other. Because the salespeople ...

Breakthrough elastic cloud-to cloud networking

1 hour ago

Scientists from AT&T, IBM and Applied Communication Sciences (ACS) announced a proof-of-concept technology that reduces set up times for cloud-to-cloud connectivity from days to seconds. This advance is a major step forward ...

User comments : 5

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

210
1 / 5 (3) Apr 06, 2011
Be SURE to give it to military units deployed OVER SEAS.
Otherwise, we would end up with 'Drive-by Jetpackings' among our civil and educated civilian populations!
El_Nose
5 / 5 (1) Apr 06, 2011
nice fly by wire technology -- but did you see the displacement of the grass by that pack -- wow -- must be using some serious thrust.
VOR
1 / 5 (1) Apr 06, 2011
needs folding wings and thrust vectoring for practical speed and range!
blengi
2.3 / 5 (3) Apr 07, 2011
needs folding wings and thrust vectoring for practical speed and range!


true, and ejector mechanism lol -
http://lh3.ggpht....ctor.gif

Wonder why it took so long to implement remote crontrolled version with dummy, surely that was a self evident option from day one?
harryhill
not rated yet Apr 07, 2011
Lovely...more noise.
Another potential 'thing' for the Military/Industrial complex to spend OUR money. Add that to the B1-B2-B52 Tanks--Carriers etc etc