Olga now raining on third of 5 Australia territories

February 1, 2010
On Jan. 30 at 1425 UTC (9:25 a.m. ET), the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Satellite captured the remnants of Olga moving from the Queensland to New South Wales Territory. Most of the rainfall was light to moderate (green), but there were isolated areas of heavy rain (red), falling at 2 inches per hour. Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce

Australians in three of five territories have had enough of Tropical Cyclone Olga. After two landfalls, and three times a tropical storm, and traveling through Queensland and the Northern Territory, Olga's remnants are now raining on Australia's New South Wales Territory today, February 1.

NASA and the Japanese Space Agency's Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed over Olga's remnants on January 30 at 1425 UTC (9:25 a.m. ET), when it was moving from the Queensland to New South Wales Territory. Most of the was light to moderate, but there were isolated areas of heavy rain falling at 2 inches per hour.

An elongated area of low pressure (known as a trough) that is associated with the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Olga is forecast to extend over western New South Wales region over the next few days. The region is expected to experience widespread rainfall of the moderate to heavy variety over the next couple of days, particularly in the western portions.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology expects some local flooding in the far northwest New South Wales region in the Tibooburra area. Other areas that may face flooding rainfall include parts of the state north of Wilcannia and Cobar and west of Walgett.

Currently there are flood warnings posted for the Darling and Warrego Rivers, but other rivers may also flood. Residents living in low-lying areas, flood plains and areas around rivers and streams should closely monitor river levels and forecasts.

As for the kinds of rainfall some of these areas can expect? If the rainfall that Olga has left in her wake is any indication, it could very well be heavy. Brisbane received .2 to .4 inches (5-10mm) of rain, however more than 13 inches (330 millimeters) of rain fell at Finch Hatton.

Explore further: NASA's TRMM satellite sees heavy rainfall in Choi-Wan

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