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Materials Science news

A composite thread that varies in rigidity

EPFL scientists have developed a new type of composite thread that varies in stiffness depending on its temperature. Applications range from multifunctional robots to knitted casts, and even tunable medical devices.

dateOct 27, 2016 in Materials Science
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Screws that fit the body's notches

Complex bone fractures are often set with titanium or steel screws and plates. However, if these remain in the body for some time, they can cause health problems. A new bioceramic screw nail has the capacity of replacing ...

dateOct 27, 2016 in Materials Science
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Turning CO2 to stone

Earth has limits to the amount of carbon dioxide in its atmosphere before the environment as we know it starts to change. Too much CO2 absorbed by the oceans makes the water more acidic. Too much in the atmosphere warms the ...

dateOct 25, 2016 in Materials Science
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Non-metal catalyst splits hydrogen molecule

Hydrogen (H2) is an extremely simple molecule and yet a valuable raw material which as a result of the development of sophisticated catalysts is becoming more and more important. In industry and commerce, applications range ...

dateOct 21, 2016 in Materials Science
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Superomniphobic tape adheres to any surface

Arun Kota, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Colorado State University, has made a superomniphobic tape that, when adhered to any surface, gives the surface liquid-repelling properties. This recent breakthrough ...

dateOct 20, 2016 in Materials Science
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Green hydrogen production using algal proteins

We are increasingly thinking about hydrogen as a successor of crude oil—for instance, through the use of hydrogen fuel cells. But where will the hydrogen come from? Industrial or domestic bioreactors using green algae could ...

Making new functional polymers for 3-D printers

Chemical engineers at the University of Melbourne have found a way to 3-D print smart polymers (or plastics) that can perform a function, in a way that is cheaper, cleaner and more accessible than ever before.

Shadows reveal how insects walk on water

Water striders' ability to walk and jump on the surfaces of ponds and lakes has long amazed curious observers—and inspired robot designers who want to mimic the bugs' talent. Now, scientists have measured for the first ...

Using light to move electrons and protons

(—In some chemical reactions both electrons and protons move together. When they transfer, they can move concertedly or in separate steps. Light-induced reactions of this sort are particularly relevant to biological ...

Finding needles in chemical haystacks

A team of chemists including Daniel Weix from the University of Rochester has developed a process for identifying new catalysts that will help synthesize drugs more efficiently and more cheaply. The trick was to do something ...

New extremely hard carbon nitride compound created

New work from a team led by Carnegie's Alexander Goncharov has created a new extremely incompressible carbon nitride compound. They say it could be the prototype for a whole new family of superhard materials, due to the unexpected ...

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