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New material steals oxygen from the air

Researchers from the University of Southern Denmark have synthesized crystalline materials that can bind and store oxygen in high concentrations. Just one spoon of the substance is enough to absorb all the ...

15 hours ago
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Neutral self-assembling peptide hydrogel

Self-assembling peptides are characterized by a stable β-sheet structure and are known to undergo self-assembly into nanofibers that could further form a hydrogel. Self-assembling peptide hydrogels have ...

18 hours ago
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Scientists make droplets move on their own

Droplets are simple spheres of fluid, not normally considered capable of doing anything on their own. But now researchers have made droplets of alcohol move through water. In the future, such moving droplets may deliver medicines, ...

Sep 29, 2014
3.8 / 5 (17) 5

How to make stronger, 'greener' cement

Concrete is the world's most-used construction material, and a leading contributor to global warming, producing as much as one-tenth of industry-generated greenhouse-gas emissions. Now a new study suggests ...

Sep 25, 2014
4.5 / 5 (17) 4

Smartgels are thicker than water

Transforming substances from liquids into gels plays an important role across many industries, including cosmetics, medicine, and energy. But the transformation process, called gelation, where manufacturers ...

Sep 19, 2014
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Separation of para and ortho water

(Phys.org) —Not all water is equal—at least not at the molecular level. There are two versions of the water molecule, para and ortho water, in which the spin states of the hydrogen nuclei are different. ...

Sep 18, 2014
4.5 / 5 (6) 1

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A dye with tunable optical characteristics

Researchers from RIKEN and the University of Tokyo have developed an organic dye molecule with tunable light-absorption and color characteristics. This development promises to open the door to the creation ...

How salt causes buildings to crumble

Salt crystals are often responsible when buildings start to show signs of aging. Researchers from the Institute for Building Materials have studied salt damage in greater depth and can now predict weathering ...

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Seeing clearly through a liquid

Accurately examining materials in liquids using electron microscopy is a difficult task for scientists, as electron beams perturb the sample and induce artifacts. This is especially true when using in situ ...

Sandblasting winds shift Mars' landscape

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