Related topics: stem cells · cells · scaffold · tissue · cartilage

New technique for engineering living materials and patterns

A new method for engineering living materials called 'MeniFluidics', made by researchers at the University of Warwick could see a transformation in tissue engineering and bio-art, as well as new ways to research cellular ...

Nanofiber membranes transformed into 3-D scaffolds

In the movie "Transformers," cars morph into robots, jets or a variety of machinery. A similar concept inspired a group of researchers to combine gas foaming, which is a blend of chemicals that induces gas bubbling, and 3-D ...

Ultra-precision nano-sensor could detect iron disorders

Chronic iron imbalances—having either too little or too much iron in the blood—can result in medical conditions ranging from anaemia and haemochromatosis through to more severe diseases, such as cancer, Parkinson's Disease ...

Heat and light create new biocompatible microparticles

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have devised a method for making small particles that are safe for living tissues that will allow them to create new shapes attractive for drug delivery, diagnostics and tissue engineering.

Collagen can withstand more strain than previously known

Researchers in the Department of Physics at King's College London have discovered that collagen fibrils can withstand a significantly higher amount of strain than previously thought, broadening our understanding of tissue ...

Machine sucks up tiny tissue spheroids and prints them precisely

A new method of bioprinting uses aspiration of tiny biologics such as spheroids, cells and tissue strands, to precisely place them in 3-D patterns either on scaffolding or without to create artificial tissues with natural ...

Superior 'bio-ink' for 3-D printing pioneered

Rutgers biomedical engineers have developed a "bio-ink" for 3-D printed materials that could serve as scaffolds for growing human tissues to repair or replace damaged ones in the body.

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