Related topics: stem cells · cells · scaffold · tissue · cartilage

Researchers probe cell nucleus response with needle-tip technique

Kaitlin McCreery is the coauthor of a new paper published in Small that deals with diagnosing diseases such as osteoarthritis in soft tissue. McCreery is currently a Ph.D. student in the Neu Lab where she studies the biophysical ...

Researchers report new approach to cultured meat

Humans are largely omnivores, and meat has featured in the diets of most cultures. However, with the increasing population and pressure on the environment, traditional methods of meeting this fundamental food requirement ...

4-D bioengineering materials bend, curve like natural tissue

Tissue engineering has long-depended on geometrically static scaffolds seeded with cells in the lab to create new tissues and even organs. The scaffolding material—usually a biodegradable polymer structure—is supplied ...

Physicists discover new route to active matter self-organisation

An international team led by Professor Yilin Wu, Associate Professor of the Department of Physics at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) has made a novel conceptual advance in the field of active matter science. The ...

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Tissue engineering

Tissue engineering was once categorised as a subfield of Biomaterials, but having grown in scope and importance it can be considered as a field in its own right. It is the use of a combination of cells, engineering and materials methods, and suitable biochemical and physio-chemical factors to improve or replace biological functions. While most definitions of tissue engineering cover a broad range of applications, in practice the term is closely associated with applications that repair or replace portions of or whole tissues (i.e., bone, cartilage, blood vessels, bladder, etc.). Often, the tissues involved require certain mechanical and structural properties for proper functioning. The term has also been applied to efforts to perform specific biochemical functions using cells within an artificially-created support system (e.g. an artificial pancreas, or a bioartificial liver). The term regenerative medicine is often used synonymously with tissue engineering, although those involved in regenerative medicine place more emphasis on the use of stem cells to produce tissues.

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