Removal of a gene could render lethal poxviruses harmless

The removal of one gene renders poxviruses—a lethal family of viral infections that are known to spread from animals to humans—harmless, a new study in the journal Science Advances reports.

Study finds clues to aging in 'junk' DNA

For decades, greater than 60% of the human genome was believed to be "junk DNA" that served little or no purpose in the course of human development. Recent research by Colorado State University is challenging this notion ...

Mechanisms responsible for tissue growth

In adult tissue, the number of cells in tissues and organs remains constant, and any new cells produced by cell division need to be compensated by the loss of other cells. In contrast, during postnatal growth, an excess of ...

A molecular atlas of skin cells

Skin is protective against physical injury, radiation and microbes, and at the same time, produces hair and facilitates perspiration. Details of how skin cells manage such disparate tasks have so far remained elusive. Now, ...

Neuron-like activity detected in an unforeseen place

The cells under Sanford M. Simon's microscope could easily be mistaken for neurons—they sport the characteristic long branches, and blips of light indicating bursts of calcium traveling from cell to cell. But looks can ...

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