Related topics: stem cells · embryonic stem cells · cells · skin cells · genes

Recreating the earliest stages of life

In their effort to understand the very earliest stages of life and how they can go wrong, scientists are confronted with ethical issues surrounding the use of human embryos. The use of animal embryos is also subject to restrictions ...

Researchers generate human-monkey chimeric embryos

Investigators in China and the United States have injected human stem cells into primate embryos and were able to grow chimeric embryos for a significant period of time—up to 20 days. The research, despite its ethical concerns, ...

New method expands the world of small RNAs

A team led by a biomedical scientist at the University of California, Riverside, has developed a new RNA-sequencing method— "Panoramic RNA Display by Overcoming RNA Modification Aborted Sequencing," or PANDORA-seq—that ...

Research illuminates embryonic stem cell fate

USC postdoctoral researcher Xi Chen knows that you have to break a few eggs in order to grow chicken stem cells. His work on maintaining embryonic stem cells (ESC) from chicken eggs provides insight into stem cell pluripotency ...

Mouse sperm generated in rats

Making gametes such as sperm and eggs from pluripotent stem cells—primitive cells that can make all the tissues—greatly contributes to efficient reproduction of livestock animals and future assisted reproductive medicine. ...

Stem cells provide hope for dwindling wildlife populations

A paper recently published in the scientific journal Stem Cells and Development shares an important advancement in conservation—one that may make the difference between survival and extinction for wildlife species that ...

The force to shape an organ

Carnegie Mellon University professor of biomedical engineering and materials science and engineering Adam Feinberg, along with postdoctoral fellow Dan Shiwarski and graduate student Joshua Tashman, have created a novel biosensor ...

page 1 from 40

Pluripotency

Pluripotency in the broad sense refers to "having more than one potential outcome." In biological systems, this can refer either to cells or to biological compounds. From the Latin pluri=many, potent=power, capacity. A pluripotent cell can create all cell types except for extra embryonic tissue, unlike a totipotent cell, (tot=all), which can produce every cell type including extra embryonic tissue.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA