Related topics: stem cells · embryonic stem cells · cells · skin cells · genes

Scientists engineer synthetic DNA to study 'architect' genes

Researchers at New York University have created artificial Hox genes—which plan and direct where cells go to develop tissues or organs—using new synthetic DNA technology and genomic engineering in stem cells.

Unraveling the origins of the human spine

The spinal column is the central supporting structure of the skeleton in all vertebrates. Not only does it provide a place for muscles to attach, it also protects the spinal cord and nerve roots. Defects in its development ...

A molecular glue for turning on human cell pluripotency

There are cells in the body known as pluripotent stem cells that are yet to specialize in a particular biological function. These cells maintain the potential to become any of the possible cell types in an organism. Pluripotent ...

Cilia-free stem cells offer new path to study rare diseases

A group of rare diseases called "ciliopathies"—polycystic kidney disease notable among them—emerge from defects in cilia, the tiny hair-like structures on the surface of almost every cell type. But the specific molecular-level ...

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Pluripotency

Pluripotency in the broad sense refers to "having more than one potential outcome." In biological systems, this can refer either to cells or to biological compounds. From the Latin pluri=many, potent=power, capacity. A pluripotent cell can create all cell types except for extra embryonic tissue, unlike a totipotent cell, (tot=all), which can produce every cell type including extra embryonic tissue.

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