Related topics: protein · gene expression · rna molecules · cells · genes

The new heroics of RNA in cell differentiation

Scientists are increasingly learning of new reasons to appreciate RNA, and the glycolytic enzyme ENO1 seems to have provided yet another in new research from EMBL this week, as published in Molecular Cell.

Exploring new roles for non-coding RNA

The past decade has seen enormous advances in the understanding of regulatory noncoding RNAs, according to a Northwestern Medicine review published in Molecular Cell.

Researchers reveal cellular diversity of esophageal tissue

In a study published today in the journal Nature Communications, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University defined 11 subsets of cells found in the esophagus of mice, information that could potentially ...

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Messenger RNA

Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) is a molecule of RNA encoding a chemical "blueprint" for a protein product. mRNA is transcribed from a DNA template, and carries coding information to the sites of protein synthesis: the ribosomes. Here, the nucleic acid polymer is translated into a polymer of amino acids: a protein. In mRNA as in DNA, genetic information is encoded in the sequence of nucleotides arranged into codons consisting of three bases each. Each codon encodes for a specific amino acid, except the stop codons that terminate protein synthesis. This process requires two other types of RNA: transfer RNA (tRNA) mediates recognition of the codon and provides the corresponding amino acid, while ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is the central component of the ribosome's protein manufacturing machinery.

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