Related topics: children · vegetables

Does rearranging chromosomes affect their function?

Molecular biologists have long thought that domains in the genome's 3-D organization control how genes are expressed. After studying highly rearranged chromosomes in fruit flies, EMBL researchers now reveal that while this ...

Insects feel chronic pain after injury

Associate Professor Greg Neely and his team of pain researchers in the Charles Perkins Centre have found compelling evidence that insects feel persistent pain after injury.

Study finds that parental 'memory' is inherited across generations

Are our personalities and behaviors shaped more by our genes or our circumstances? While this age-old "nature vs. nurture" question continues to confound us and fuel debates, a growing body of evidence from research conducted ...

Fruit bats can transform echoes into images

Bats are creatures of the night and are accustomed to complete darkness. They harness their hypersensitive hearing to feed, to fend off prey and to mate.

Learning from experience is all in the timing

As animals explore their environment, they learn to master it. By discovering what sounds tend to precede predatorial attack, for example, or what smells predict dinner, they develop a kind of biological clairvoyance—a ...

page 1 from 23

Fruit

The term fruit has different meanings dependent on context, and the term is not synonymous in food preparation and biology. Fruits are the means by which flowering plants disseminate seeds, and the presence of seeds indicates that a structure is most likely a fruit, though not all seeds come from fruits.

No single terminology really fits the enormous variety that is found among plant fruits. The term 'false fruit' (pseudocarp, accessory fruit) is sometimes applied to a fruit like the fig (a multiple-accessory fruit; see below) or to a plant structure that resembles a fruit but is not derived from a flower or flowers. Some gymnosperms, such as yew, have fleshy arils that resemble fruits and some junipers have berry-like, fleshy cones. The term "fruit" has also been inaccurately applied to the seed-containing female cones of many conifers.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA